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I have never "hand-coded" object creation code for SQL Server and foreign key decleration is seemingly different between SQL Server and Postgres. Here is my sql so far:

drop table exams;
drop table question_bank;
drop table anwser_bank;

create table exams
(
    exam_id uniqueidentifier primary key,
    exam_name varchar(50),
);
create table question_bank
(
    question_id uniqueidentifier primary key,
    question_exam_id uniqueidentifier not null,
    question_text varchar(1024) not null,
    question_point_value decimal,
    constraint question_exam_id foreign key references exams(exam_id)
);
create table anwser_bank
(
    anwser_id           uniqueidentifier primary key,
    anwser_question_id  uniqueidentifier,
    anwser_text         varchar(1024),
    anwser_is_correct   bit
);

When I run the query I get this error:

Msg 8139, Level 16, State 0, Line 9 Number of referencing columns in foreign key differs from number of referenced columns, table 'question_bank'.

Can you spot the error?

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FYI, always best to name your constraints, especially with ORMs in use. –  Tracker1 Jul 30 '12 at 21:31
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5 Answers

up vote 67 down vote accepted
create table question_bank
(
    question_id uniqueidentifier primary key,
    question_exam_id uniqueidentifier not null,
    question_text varchar(1024) not null,
    question_point_value decimal,
    foreign key ( question_exam_id ) references exams (exam_id)
);
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22  
It can also be helpful to name the foreign key constraint. This helps with troubleshooting fk violations. For example: "foreign key fk_questionbank_exams ( question_exam_id ) references exams (exam_id)" –  John Vasileff Sep 7 '08 at 21:06
18  
I agree naming constraints is a good plan but, in SQL Server 2008 R2 at least, the syntax of the last line has to be "constraint fk_questionbank_exams foreign key (question_exam_id) references exams (exam_id)" –  LordSauce Apr 16 '12 at 14:23
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And if you just want to create the constraint on its own, you can use ALTER TABLE

alter table MyTable
add constraint MyTable_MyColumn_FK FOREIGN KEY ( MyColumn ) references MyOtherTable(PKColumn)

I wouldn't recommend the syntax mentioned by Sara Chipps for inline creation, just because I would rather name my own constraints.

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10  
I know this is dead old... but I got here from a google search and so many others could. Just a quick fix: the correct way to reference is: REFERENCES MyOtherTable(MyOtherIDColumn) –  PedroC88 Jan 25 '11 at 21:18
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You can also name your foreign key constraint by using:

CONSTRAINT your_name_here FOREIGN KEY (question_exam_id) REFERENCES EXAMS (exam_id)
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1  
When using an ORM, it's helpful to have named constraints with multiple references to the foreign table... Used named constraints in properties with EF4, so that I knew which contact table entry was for buyer, seller, etc. –  Tracker1 Jul 30 '12 at 21:30
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create table question_bank
(
    question_id uniqueidentifier primary key,
    question_exam_id uniqueidentifier not null constraint fk_exam_id foreign key references exams(exam_id),
    question_text varchar(1024) not null,
    question_point_value decimal
);

--That will work too. Pehaps a bit more intuitive construct?

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Like you, I don't usually create foreign keys by hand, but if for some reason I need the script to do so I usually create it using ms sql server management studio and before saving then changes, I select Table Designer | Generate Change Script

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