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My string length is constant but actual data length will vary as like below,

"           1,54" // will be displayed as "- 1,54"
"123456789012,12" // will be dsiplayed as "- 123456789012,12"
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1  
smells Homework... –  Javed Akram Feb 2 '11 at 17:02
2  
@Javed would be the stupidest homework ever –  user142019 Feb 2 '11 at 17:06
    
.. homework, nonetheless! –  karlphillip Feb 2 '11 at 17:07
    
@Thi If it is, please tag your question as so. We still are going to help you. –  karlphillip Feb 2 '11 at 17:15
1  
@Jeremy in which he says he is torn on it. Meta tags are discouraged, homework is a meta tag, so meta tag is discouraged. There certainly doesn't need to be any discussion about whether this question is homework or not. The fact is that it doesn't matter. Judge the question on its merits. –  Will Feb 2 '11 at 22:01

6 Answers 6

Wouldn't it be easiest to just put a '-' in the format string when you display the data?

printf("-%f", 1.54);
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That was the first thought, but I didn't believe someone would upvote it. –  karlphillip Feb 2 '11 at 17:09
    
@karlphillip: I didn't expect any up-votes either. Then again, I'm often surprised -- sometimes (what I thought was) a good answer that took a lot of work gets completely ignored. Other times, an obvious one-liner like this does get up-votes. C'est la vie... –  Jerry Coffin Feb 2 '11 at 17:36
    
bad solution: printf will not print a ',', with default-locale it print only a '.' –  user411313 Feb 2 '11 at 18:52
    
@Jerry - I have to remove spaces in fron of number and put a minus sign so just adding "-" "%f" won't work for my requirement –  Thi Feb 2 '11 at 19:21
    
@Thi: actually, it will -- you just have to convert your input string to a number first: scanf("%lf", &number);. Alternative, you can leave it as a string, but strip off the leading spaces: scanf("%s", buf) (and use %s to print the result, of course). –  Jerry Coffin Feb 2 '11 at 19:39

I suggest using sprintf() in this case.

I updated the code so it discards all whitespaces in the beginning but 1. That way you will have the - sign followed by a whitespace, and then the number. I left a few comments in the code along with some commented printf() to help you debug the code if you want.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char* num = "   1,54";

    int c = 0;
    if (strlen(num) > 0)
    {
        c = num[0]; // Safely storing the first character. Is it a whitespace?
    }
    else
    {
        printf("String is empty!\n");
        return -1;
    }

    int wspace_count = 0;  // number of whitespaces detected
    while (c == 32) // ASCII 32 = whitespace
    {
        c = num[wspace_count];
        if (c == 32)
            wspace_count++;
    }

    //printf("whitespaces detected: %d\n", wspace_count);
    //printf("total chars in num: %d\n", strlen(num));

    int chars_to_copy = strlen(num) - wspace_count+1; // +1 becouse you want to leave 1 whitespace there, right?
    //printf("chars_to_copy: %d\n", chars_to_copy);

    int tmp_size = chars_to_copy + 1; // another +1 becouse you need to append '\0' at the end
    char* tmp = malloc(tmp_size);
    int pos = wspace_count - 1;
    strncpy(tmp, &num[pos], chars_to_copy);
    tmp[strlen(tmp)] = '\0';    // add '\0' at the end

    //printf("tmp = \"%s\" \n", tmp);

    char* result = (char*) malloc(strlen(tmp) + 3); // 1 byte for the - sign, 1 for the  space after it, 1 for the '\0' at the end
    sprintf(result, "- %s", tmp);

    printf("%s\n", result);

    return 0;
}

Outputs:

- 1,54
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I have to admit that's better than mine. +1. –  GeorgeAl Feb 2 '11 at 17:09
    
Btw, a minor comment, I think that since you want to add a small whitespace you should do strlen(num) + 3 because AFAIK strlen() does not include \0 in its calculations –  GeorgeAl Feb 2 '11 at 17:30
    
will crash because you add 2 chars "- " and have only space for one. –  user411313 Feb 2 '11 at 18:49
    
@karlphillip - my source string may have space(s) in front of number. I need to put "-" sign before number. –  Thi Feb 2 '11 at 19:15
    
Updated code according to suggestions. @Thi I might update the code to adress this NEW constraint, but it wasn't on the original question. –  karlphillip Feb 2 '11 at 19:26

I would do something like that:

Assuming str1 is the old string

int strLen1 = strlen(str1);
char * newStr = malloc(sizeof(char) *(strLen1+ 2));
*newStr = '-';
++newStr;
strcpy(newStr , str1);

You could infact avoid strlen() all together and do

char * newStr = malloc(sizeof(str1)+1);
*newStr = '-';
++newStr;
strcpy(newStr , str1);

But keep in mind that what sizeof(str1) will return depends on how you defined str1.

Don't forget to free()

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I'm guessing you don't want the spaces to be printed out, so:

char str[LEN] = "          1,54";
char *nid = str;
while (*nid == ' ') {
    *nid = '-';
    nid++;
}
printf("%s", --nid);
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im guessing thi is french and ,= decimal if so then doing bitwise manipulation and calculation the two's complement should work.

in pseudocode:

temp = 2700;
newtemp = ~temp;
newtemp = newtemp + 1;      //Two's compliment
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've implemented below function to carry out my requirement. Converting input string into a number is won't work for me since my string has two part (" 123,54") with comma separated.

static char *
fmtsign(char * buffer)
{
     char               tmpbuf[20];
     char               number[20];

     int i, len, space = 0;

     memset(tmpbuf, 0x00, sizeof tmpbuf);
     memset(number, 0x00, sizeof number);

     len = (int)strlen(buffer);

     for (i = 0; i < len; i++)
     {
          if (buffer[i] == ' ')
          {
              space++;
          }
          else
              break;
     }

     strncpy(number, &buffer[space], len - space);

     sprintf(tmpbuf, "- %s", number);

     memset(buffer, 0x00, sizeof buffer);

     strcpy(buffer, tmpbuf);

     return (buffer);
}

Outputs:

- 1234567,89
    - 123,45
      - 0,00
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