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I'd like to query for metadata about XML, to help determine some XML's structure. I have a 49 MB xml file that I just need to know the list of all properties and child tags and some basic information about them. Can I query this from the XML itself or do I have to laboriously go through it and find each element and property that can exist in it? There is no schema definition available.

Given some random XML like the following:

DECLARE @x xml
SET @x = 
'<People>
 <Person age="35">
  <Name>Pete</Name>  
  <Phone>
   <Mobile>555-555-1234</Mobile>
   <Home>555-555-0001</Home>
  </Phone>
 </Person>
 <Person age="40" height="70 inches">
  <Name>Paul</Name>  
  <Phone>
   <Mobile>555-555-4567</Mobile>
  </Phone>
 </Person>
 <Person age="24">
  <Name>Susan</Name>  
  <Phone>
   <Home>555-555-2323</Home>
  </Phone>
 </Person>
</People>'

How would I query this to return something like the following? I don't need a single recordset (though that would of course be nice). I would be quite content with having to query repeatedly to get different parts. I might have to see there's a root People tag first, then query People and see the Person tag, then finally see the Name and Phone tags under that, and so on.

People maxcount=1
People.Person maxcount=3 [age maxlen=2 maxcount=3] [weight maxlen=9 maxcount=1]
Person.Name textnode maxcount=1 maxlen=5
Person.Name.Phone maxcount=1
Person.Name.Mobile textnode maxcount=1 maxlen=12
Person.Name.Home textnode maxcount=1 maxlen=12
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Why would you want to do this using SQL Server? –  John Saunders Feb 3 '11 at 0:41
    
Good point. I was thinking about that yesterday. While it would be very convenient to be able to do this kind of meta-analysis, I suppose the real answer is to just fire up an XML library and do the analysis myself. –  ErikE Feb 3 '11 at 18:31

2 Answers 2

Extracting the structure is doable (as illustrated by below query), but like John said... why? If its to enforce constraints then use an xsd, and read that into your app instead.

declare @data xml

set @data = '
<People>
 <Person age="35">
  <Name>Pete</Name>  
  <Phone>
   <Mobile>555-555-1234</Mobile>
   <Home>555-555-0001</Home>
  </Phone>
 </Person>
 <Person age="40" height="70 inches">
  <Name>Paul</Name>  
  <Phone>
   <Mobile>555-555-4567</Mobile>
  </Phone>
 </Person>
 <Person age="24">
  <Name>Susan</Name>  
  <Phone>
   <Home>555-555-2323</Home>
  </Phone>
 </Person>
</People>'

;with c_Tree (Parent, Node)
as  (   select  p.n.value('local-name(..)[1]', 'varchar(max)'),
                p.n.value('local-name(.)[1]', 'varchar(max)')
        from    @data.nodes('//*[local-name(.) > ""]') p(n)
    ),
    c_Expand(lvl, RootName, NodeName)
as (    select  0,
                Parent,
                Node
        from    c_Tree
        where   Parent = ''
        union all
        select  ce.lvl + 1,
                ct.Parent,
                ct.Node
        from    c_Tree ct
        join    c_Expand ce on
                ce.NodeName = ct.Parent
)
select   RootName+'>'+NodeName,
         lvl
from     c_Expand
order
by      lvl asc;
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This type of profiling is probably best done through structured program code. Just because the xml may be in a database doesn't mean that the analysis of the xml has to be done there.

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