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So I'm trying to assign the values of one linked list to another, exterior linked list (not in the current method) using iterators.

LIST_ITER i = temp.begin();
while(bLeft != end)
{
    *bLeft = *i;
    ++i;
    ++bLeft;
}

This is only a portion of the code, the iterator i is for the temp list, whereas bLeft and end are the beginning and end (respectively) of the exterior list.

This above code, however, is producing a strange error where I get a bunch of strange text (some of it actually says something about Microsoft Windows Compatible etc. etc.) that when run on a Unix machine just gives a Segmentation Fault.

EDIT: Here is the code in its entirety:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

typedef list<string> LIST;                            // linked list type
typedef LIST::size_type LIST_SIZE;              // size type for list, e.g., unsigned
typedef LIST::iterator LIST_ITER;                 // iterator type
typedef LIST::value_type LIST_CONTAINS;   // type in the list, i.e., a string

void merge_sort(LIST_ITER beg, LIST_ITER end, LIST_SIZE sz);
void merge(LIST_ITER bLeft, LIST_ITER bRight, LIST_ITER end);

int main()
{
LIST l;
LIST_CONTAINS v;
// Read in the data...
while (cin >> v)
l.push_back(v);
// Merge the data...

LIST_ITER i = l.begin();
LIST_ITER iEnd = l.end();
merge_sort(i, iEnd, v.size());
// Output everything...
for (; i != iEnd; ++i)
{
    cout << *i << '\n';
}
system("pause");
}

void merge_sort(LIST_ITER beg, LIST_ITER end, LIST_SIZE sz)
{
if(sz < 2)
{
    return;
}
else
{
    LIST_SIZE halfsz = (distance(beg, end)/2); //half of list size
    LIST_ITER i1End = beg; //iterator for the end of the first list
    advance(i1End, halfsz); //advance to the midpoint
    i2 = i1End++; //iterator for the beginning of the second list
    --end;//iterator for the end of the second list

    merge_sort(beg, i1End, halfsz); //recursively pass first list
    merge_sort(i2, end, halfsz); //recursively pass second list     
}
merge(beg, i2, end);
}

void merge(LIST_ITER bLeft, LIST_ITER bRight, LIST_ITER end)
{

LIST temp;
LIST_ITER beg = bLeft;
LIST_ITER halfw = bRight;
LIST_ITER i = temp.begin();


while(beg != bRight && halfw != end)
{
    if(*beg < *halfw)
    {
        temp.push_back(*halfw);
        halfw++;
    }
    else
    {
        temp.push_back(*beg);
        beg++;
    }   
}

while(beg != bRight)
{
    temp.push_back(*beg);
    beg++;
}
while(halfw != end)
{
    temp.push_back(*halfw);
    halfw++;
}

while(bLeft != end) ///HERE IS THE PREVIOUSLY POSTED CODE
{
    *bLeft = *i;
    ++i;
    ++bLeft;
}

}
share|improve this question
    
how are bLeft and end initialized? – AShelly Feb 2 '11 at 20:16
    
Probably you did't allocate enough memory for temp, so ++i will be run out of bounds. – Murilo Vasconcelos Feb 2 '11 at 20:18
    
What kind of iterators are you using? If the list bLeft is pointing to is empty, the code will break. – José Tomás Tocino Feb 2 '11 at 20:18
    
is LIST_ITER a typedef? – Sam Miller Feb 2 '11 at 20:18
    
@AShelly Where the original list (which these pointers are pointing to) is l, l.begin(); l.end(); initialized in main() @Sam Miller yes, LIST_ITER is a typedef for LIST::iterator, sorry I missed that. – muttley91 Feb 2 '11 at 20:19

Most likely cause is that the source list doesn't have enough elements in it. Without more information (or context), it's not possible to be more precise, though.

share|improve this answer

Shouldn't the loop test be:

while (bLeft != end && i != temp.end())

How do you know that i is bigger than the other container?

share|improve this answer
    
Or maybe while ((i != temp.end()) && (bLeft != end)). Of course, which of the potential consitionals are correct depends on what the pre-conditions are and what the desired post-condition is. – Michael Burr Feb 2 '11 at 20:23
    
We aren't allowed to use the end() function anymore than I have already used. – muttley91 Feb 2 '11 at 20:26

Why not use std::list's assign method? If the data in the two lists are of the same type, that really should be all you need, no?

share|improve this answer
    
There's a big list of restrictions, which basically limit us from using all of the list functions, except for the ones I have used in my code. I would list them, but it is a lengthy list. – muttley91 Feb 2 '11 at 20:25

Seems like what you are trying to accomplish could be accomplished with the assign function.

exterior.assign(temp.begin(), temp.end());

This should assign the exterior list the values of the temp list from beginning to end.

share|improve this answer

If you're going to continue using the temporary list afterwards, use std::copy. If you're not, using std::list.splice.

share|improve this answer

I think I've discovered the error, it has to do with how I've incremented some of my iterators unnecessarily (such as decrementing the "end" unnecessarily) and my code still has errors but I need to go through it some more.

Thanks for the suggestions!

share|improve this answer

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