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I have this perfectly working using 1 onClick call (does an email validation).

<script type='text/javascript'>
function emailValidator(elem, helperMsg){
    var emailExp = /^[\w\-\.\+]+\@[a-zA-Z0-9\.\-]+\.[a-zA-z0-9]{2,4}$/;
    if(elem.value.match(emailExp)){
        return true;
    }else{
        alert(helperMsg);
        elem.focus();
        return false;
    }
}
</script>

In the body of my page

<a href="#" 
   title="Yes, Count Me In!" 
   onclick="emailValidator(document.getElementById('email'), 'Please Enter A Valid Email'); return false;"
>

----> Now, is it possible to perform a condition for this onClick? If the email field is valid, run this other additional call (rsvp('yes');).

<a href="#" 
   title="Yes, Count Me In!" 
   onclick="emailValidator(document.getElementById('email'), 'Please Enter A Valid Email'); rsvp('yes'); return false;" 
>
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yeah, shure that's possible, but it'll probably not work out how you want it to. As is, your code will call the rsvp-function nomatter what you get from the emailValidator-function. You probably want to do something like this:

<a href="#" title="Yes, Count Me In!" onclick="if(emailValidator(document.getElementById('email'), 'Please Enter A Valid Email')){rsvp('yes');};return false;">

Another smart hint for you is to replace the document.getElementById-part with this, like so:

<a href="#" title="Yes, Count Me In!" onclick="if(emailValidator(this, 'Please Enter A Valid Email')){rsvp('yes');};return false;">

This should make sure that even if you rename the input's id, it'd still work. When inside a onclick, or onchange or whatever, this always reffer to the object being clicked/edited/etc.

Also, as suggested by others I'd recommend making a function that does this for you, but I know peoples who like to put all their logic in the onclick-handler, and since this is what you asked for I'd thought I'd show how. Note however that this gets messy fast, and doing something like

function rsvpClick() {
    if(emailValidator(document.getElementById('email'), 'Please Enter A Valid Email')) rsvp('yes');
}

and then

<a href="#" title="Yes, Count Me In!" onclick="rsvpClick();">

normally is much more clean and readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Alxandr, this worked perfectly for my situation! –  detonate Feb 2 '11 at 21:28
<a href="#" title="Yes, Count me In!" onclick="myFunction">

<script>
    function myFunction() {
        var elem = document.getElementById("email");
        emailValidator(elem, 'Please Enter A Valid Email') && rsvp('yes'); 
    }

    var emailExp = /^[\w\-\.\+]+\@[a-zA-Z0-9\.\-]+\.[a-zA-z0-9]{2,4}$/;

    function emailValidator(elem, helperMsg){
        return elem.value.match(emailExp) ?
            true :
            (alert(helperMsg), elem.focus(), false);
    }

</script>

First abstract that onclick code to a global function. Then validate the email and only run the rsvp function if the email is valid (i.e. it returns true)

share|improve this answer

make a global function that handle the logic and call this function into your onclick event

share|improve this answer

You could just add a call to your rsvp() function if it passes the validation. Like this:

function ValidateAndRSVP(elem, helperMsg){     
    var emailExp = /^[\w\-\.\+]+\@[a-zA-Z0-9\.\-]+\.[a-zA-z0-9]{2,4}$/;     
    if(elem.value.match(emailExp)){  
        rsvp('yes');      
        return true;     
    }
    else{         
        alert(helperMsg);         
        elem.focus();         
        return false;     
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is gennerally speaking a bad idea since emailValidator is a function-name that implements that all it does is to validate an email-address. You should separate this into two functions or rename it to something that makes sense. –  Alxandr Feb 2 '11 at 20:34
    
@Alxandr How is this different than what you are suggesting? the function name? My intention is to provide the OP a solution within his own code and understanding not to rewrite his whole function or code unless necessary. There is nothing wrong with this answer, except for it not being a "Best Practice". –  Victor Feb 2 '11 at 20:38
    
Yeah, if he uses the emailValidator-function any other place that'd screw up everything. It's that simple. Not just about best practice, if it was there's a lot more to talk about, but adding something that doesn't have anything to do with validation to a validator-function is a bad idea. It's not the lack of best practice, it's just wrong to do, and ends up causing a lot of confusion, and normally code-duplication. –  Alxandr Feb 2 '11 at 20:44
    
@Alxandr I cant disagree with what you are saying; however I am not one to impose my thoughts on others. I renamed the function to indicate the change in functionality. At the end of the day, perhaps the OP wants to do both everytime this function is called. So it is not a validator function anymore, renaming it is not a problem. –  Victor Feb 2 '11 at 20:50
    
It's not about imposing thoughts, it about OP asking a question. Of cause what OP wants is something that works, but when the difference is so small it's not a good idea to learn away bad practices. Remember, if this is something new for him, he'll probably go with that way of coding until he learns better. –  Alxandr Feb 2 '11 at 20:57

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