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I get a StackOverflowException when I run the following code:

private void MyButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  MyButton_Click_Aux();
}

private static volatile int reportCount;

private static void MyButton_Click_Aux() {
  try { /*remove because stack overflows without*/ }
  finally {
    var myLogData = new ArrayList();
    myLogData.Add(reportCount);
    myLogData.Add("method MyButtonClickAux");
    Log(myLogData);
  }
}

private static void Log(object logData) {
  // my log code is not matter
}

What could be causing the StackOverflowException?

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31  
"it must therefore be bug in the .net" Probably not. –  Jason Feb 2 '11 at 21:05
8  
Please post the code for MyButton_Click_Aux –  Dave Mateer Feb 2 '11 at 21:06
7  
Please include code in MyButton_Click_Aux. –  Andreas Vendel Feb 2 '11 at 21:06
7  
By the way, I should point out that you can't catch a StackOverflowException. A StackOverflowException is a deadly situation as you've blown up the execution stack because of too many nested calls. It means your program is terminally ill, and should have the plug pulled. And that's exactly what the CLR does, it kills your process. –  Jason Feb 2 '11 at 21:35
10  
-9? He's just asking for help! –  Greg D Feb 2 '11 at 21:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I know how to stop it from happening

I just don't know why it causes it (yet). And it would appear you have indeed found a bug either in the .Net BCL or, more likely, in the JIT.

I just commented out all the lines in the MyButton_Click_Aux method and then started bringing them back in, one by one.

Take off the volatile from the static int and you'll no longer get a StackOverflowException.

Now to research why... Clearly something to do with Memory Barriers is causing an issue - perhaps somehow forcing the MyButton_Click_Aux method to call itself...

UPDATE

Okay so other people are finding that .Net 3.5 is not an issue.

I'm using .Nt 4 as well so these comments relate to that:

As I said, take the volatile off and it works.

Equally, if you put the volatile back on and remove the try/finally it also works:

private static void MyButton_Click_Aux()
{
  //try { /*remove because stack overflows without*/ }
  //finally
  //{
    var myLogData = new ArrayList(); 
    myLogData.Add(reportCount); 
    //myLogData.Add("method MyButtonClickAux");
    //Log(myLogData);
  //}
}  

I also wondered if it was something to do with the uninitialised reportCount when the try/finally is in. But it makes no difference if you initialise it to zero.

I'm looking at the IL now - although it might require someone with some ASM chaps to get involved...

Final Update As I say, this really is going to require analysis of the JIT output to really understand what's happening and whilst I find it fun to analyse assembler - I feel it's probably a job for someone in Microsoft so this bug can actually be confirmed and fixed! That said - it appears to be a pretty narrow set of circumstances.

I've moved over to a release build to get rid of all the IL noise (nops etc) for analysis.

This has, however, had a complicating impact on the diagnosis. I thought I had it but didn't - but now I know what it is.

I tried this code:

private static void MyButton_Click_Aux()
{
  try { }
  finally
  {
    var myLogData = new ArrayList();
    Console.WriteLine(reportCount);
    //myLogData.Add("method MyButtonClickAux");
    //Log(myLogData);
  }
}

With the int as volatile. It runs without fault. Here's the IL:

.maxstack 1
L_0000: leave.s L_0015
L_0002: newobj instance void [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList::.ctor()
L_0007: pop 
L_0008: volatile. 
L_000a: ldsfld int32 modreq([mscorlib]System.Runtime.CompilerServices.IsVolatile) WindowsFormsApplication1.Form1::reportCount
L_000f: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
L_0014: endfinally 
L_0015: ret 
.try L_0000 to L_0002 finally handler L_0002 to L_0015

Then we look at the minimum code required to get the error again:

private static void MyButton_Click_Aux()
{
  try { }
  finally
  {
    var myLogData = new ArrayList();
    myLogData.Add(reportCount);
  }
}

And it's IL:

.maxstack 2
.locals init (
    [0] class [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList myLogData)
L_0000: leave.s L_001c
L_0002: newobj instance void [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList::.ctor()
L_0007: stloc.0 
L_0008: ldloc.0 
L_0009: volatile. 
L_000b: ldsfld int32 modreq([mscorlib]System.Runtime.CompilerServices.IsVolatile) WindowsFormsApplication1.Form1::reportCount
L_0010: box int32
L_0015: callvirt instance int32 [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList::Add(object)
L_001a: pop 
L_001b: endfinally 
L_001c: ret 
.try L_0000 to L_0002 finally handler L_0002 to L_001c

The difference? Well there's two that I spotted - boxing of the volatile int, and a virtual call. So I setup these two classes:

public class DoesNothingBase
{
  public void NonVirtualFooBox(object arg) { }
  public void NonVirtualFooNonBox(int arg) { }

  public virtual void FooBox(object arg) { }
  public virtual void FooNonBox(int arg) { }
}

public class DoesNothing : DoesNothingBase
{
  public override void FooBox(object arg) { }
  public override void FooNonBox(int arg) { }
}

And then tried each of these four versions of the offending method:

try { }
finally
{
  var doesNothing = new DoesNothing();
  doesNothing.FooNonBox(reportCount);
}

Which works.

try { }
finally
{
  var doesNothing = new DoesNothing();
  doesNothing.NonVirtualFooNonBox(reportCount);
}

Which also works.

try { }
finally
{
  var doesNothing = new DoesNothing();
  doesNothing.FooBox(reportCount);
}

Oops - StackOverflowException.

And:

try { }
finally
{
  var doesNothing = new DoesNothing();
  doesNothing.NonVirtualFooBox(reportCount);
}

Oops again! StackOverflowException!

We could go further with this - but the issue is, I feel, clearly caused by the boxing of the volatile int whilst inside the finally block of a try/catch... I put the code inside the try, and no problem. I added a catch clause (and put the code in there), also no problem.

It could also apply to the boxing of other value types I guess.

So, to summarise - in .Net 4.0 - in both debug and release builds - the boxing of a volatile int in a finally block appears to cause the JIT to generate code that ends up filling the stack. The fact that the stack trace simply shows 'external code' also supports this proposition.

There's even a possibility that it can't always be reproduced and might even depend on the layout and size of the code that is generated by the try/finally. It's clearly something to do with an errant jmp or something similar being generated to the wrong location which eventually repeats one or more push commands to the stack. The idea that that is being caused actually by a box operation is, frankly, fascinating!

Final Final Update

If you look at the MS Connect bug that @Hasty G found (answer further down) - you see there that the bug manifests in a similar fashion, but with a volatile bool in a catch statement.

Also - MS queued a fix for this after getting it to repro - but no hotfix available yet after 7 months. I've gone on record before as being in support of MS Connect, so I'll say no more - I don't think I need to!

Final Final Final Update (23/02/2011)

It is fixed - but not yet released. Quote from the MS Team on the MS Connect bug:

Yes, it's fixed. We're in the process of figuring out how best to ship a fix. It is already fixed in 4.5, but we'd really like to fix a batch of code generation bugs prior to 4.5 release.

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@Andras Zoltan i have not considering volatile keyword it was formerly in use with many threads but has no longer any purpose so i can remove very strange problem –  PRASHANT P Feb 3 '11 at 21:06
    
@PRASHANT P - there's more. I've also removed the try\finally from around the block and left the volatile on - and hey presto - no more StackOverflow... –  Andras Zoltan Feb 3 '11 at 21:08
    
Yeah, I noticed that removing the try/finally got rid of it. I didn't suggest that as I figured there was a reason you had that in there in the first place. –  dotalchemy Feb 3 '11 at 21:10
    
Heh, you beat me to the volatile thing :) +1 for you :p –  dotalchemy Feb 3 '11 at 21:11
2  
@Andras: Good job. (Apparently, you have a little more free time today than I do :) –  Jonathan Wood Feb 4 '11 at 0:13

The bug is in your code. Presumably, MyButton_Click_Aux() causes some method to be re-entered. However, you've inexplicably omitted that code from your question and so no one can comment on it.

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@Jonathan Wood i have no re-entry i know of recursion i have much c coding experience this is the forms only i think must be bug –  PRASHANT P Feb 3 '11 at 20:27
    
@PRASHANT: No, you have not established that. I'm glad you've updated the code in your question but what is in your try block that isn't shown? Do I understand from the comment that the missing code is what causes the overflow? At any rate, Visual Studio has a wonderful debugger. Step through the code. You can then determine for sure there is no re-entry, and if not you can see exactly where the error occurs. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 3 '11 at 20:34
1  
You have done what??? STEP THROUGH WITH THE DEBUGGER. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 3 '11 at 20:43
4  
@Jonathan Wood - I think an apology is in order to @PRASHANT P - he has indeed found a very very interesting bug... –  Andras Zoltan Feb 3 '11 at 21:04
1  
Agreeing with JW - I considered downvoting this answer, but then I realised it was to do with the distinct lack of information originally provided. I don't think any foul has been committed here. –  dotalchemy Feb 3 '11 at 21:13

You don't appear to be the only one having this problem

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1  
+1 Hasty G - good spot! Only been around since last July! Where's @Eric Lippert when you need him!? –  Andras Zoltan Feb 3 '11 at 21:21
    
Have just upvoted that - 7 months and no hotfix (I've looked through the hotfix list and not a sausage). –  Andras Zoltan Feb 3 '11 at 23:33

Does Log call back to Log? This would also cause a SO.

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@Mark Avenius this is obvious i have edit and am removing all code from Log it does not even get the call –  PRASHANT P Feb 3 '11 at 20:33
    
@Prashant: it may seem obvious, but it is nonetheless a place where a SO could occur, so I mentioned it because I cannot see what Log is doing. Just trying to help... –  Mark Avenius Feb 3 '11 at 20:45
1  
@Mark Avenius i am sorry i have receive much sarcastic in many responses i do never intend insult –  PRASHANT P Feb 3 '11 at 21:00
2  
@PRASHANT P - you have nothing to apologise for - I'm afraid apart from myself and John you were treated very harshly on this occasion. Shame on such SO heavyweights... –  Andras Zoltan Feb 3 '11 at 21:09
1  
@Andras: I agree. @Prashant, you have done nothing wrong here. –  Mark Avenius Feb 3 '11 at 21:10

When that exception happens, why not check what was recorded in call stack panel? The call stack itself can tell a lot.

Besides, low level debugging using SOS.dll and WinDbg can also tell you a lot.

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