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A followup to this previous question:

Current code:

var query = from b in books
             select new
             {
                 Title = b.Title,
                 StockAvailable = bookexamples.Count(be => 
                         be.BookID == b.BookID && 
                         be.OrderDetailID == null
                     )
             };

Goal:
Replace query with an IEnumerable<test> that should contain strongly-typed data from the LINQ query.

public class test
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public List<int> StockAvailable { get; set; }
}

Problem:
Recieve a error message:

Error 1 Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<AnonymousType#1>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<BokButik1.Models.test>'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

Question:
How should I solve this problem?

// Fullmetalboy

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Edited to clarify what I think you're trying to ask. –  Justin Morgan Feb 2 '11 at 22:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to modify the query to return test objects (currently, it is returning anomynous objects).

var query = from b in books
            select new test()
            {
                Title = b.Title,
                StockAvailable = bookexamples.Count(be => 
                        be.BookID == b.BookID && 
                        be.OrderDetailID == null
                    )
            };

You'll need to adjust StockAvailable to represent an int as Count returns an int.

Also, note, that class names in C# are written with a capital letter at the beginning.

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2  
Class names are written with a capital letter in C# by convention not by rule. There's nothing forcing you to do it that way, but still good advice. –  Charles Boyung Feb 2 '11 at 21:30
    
@FullmetalBoy and @Femaref: Having written the code in the original answer, I agree with this modification given your new requirements. It's certainly what I'd do. +1. –  Justin Morgan Feb 2 '11 at 22:16
    
Thanks guys for your help! Is there a book or a website there I can read more about c#'s rule of thumb for instance "Class names are written with a capital letter in C#"? –  HelloWorld Feb 3 '11 at 8:44
    

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