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I'm using Ruby on Rails 2.3.8 and I've got a registration form in which I receive a parameter as follows: /registration/4, which 4 is the id of a user who recommended the user that is about to register in the website.

The problem is that if the validation fails when the user submits the registation (the form renders to the controller users, action create_particular) the site will redirect to /users/create_particular, and therefore I lose the parameter with value 4 that I had before. Besides, I want the user to stay at the same url, which is /registration/4

How can I do that?

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Ajax form submit? –  Syed Aslam Feb 2 '11 at 21:35
    
No, it's form_for –  Brian Roisentul Feb 2 '11 at 21:36

5 Answers 5

Then you should rewrite your create method. You should use redirect_to :back instead of render :action

UPD

def new
  @word = Word.new(params[:word])
  @word.valid? if params[:word]
end

def create
  @word = Word.new(params[:word])
  if @word.save
    redirect_to @word
  else
    redirect_to new_word_path(:word => params[:word] )
  end
end

Looks quite dirty, but this is just a scratch

UPD 2

This is really not the best solution, but it works

# routes.rb
match 'words/new' => 'words#create', :via => :post, :as => :create_word

# words_controller
def new
  @word = Word.new
end

def create
  @word = Word.new(params[:word])

  respond_to do |format|
    if @word.save
      format.html { redirect_to(@word, :notice => 'Word was successfully created.') } 
    else
      format.html { render :action => "new" }
    end
  end
end

# views/words/new.html.erb
<%= form_for(@word, :url => create_word_path) do |f| %>
  ...
<% end %>
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No, because I'd lose the validation errors. –  Brian Roisentul Feb 2 '11 at 21:43
    
you can send your object back to new method. With all your validation errors –  fl00r Feb 2 '11 at 21:45
    
Look updated variant –  fl00r Feb 2 '11 at 22:01
    
And little cleaner solution with using valid? method –  fl00r Feb 2 '11 at 22:13
    
That doesn't work because the parameters will be in a different format than in the orignal url. I want the same url than before posting. –  Brian Roisentul Feb 2 '11 at 22:20

Submit to the current URI (e.g. action=""). When the submission is valid, redirect. POST->Redirect->GET is a good habit.

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can you please give me further details? thanks –  Brian Roisentul Feb 2 '11 at 21:55
    
Which bit don't you know how to do? I've never used Ruby myself, so perhaps this would be more useful to you: ruby-forum.com/topic/154418 –  Lee Kowalkowski Feb 3 '11 at 22:17

From the top of my head:

Edit your controller (registrations_controller.rb file). Create method by default contains following piece of code:

if @registration.save
        format.html {  }
        format.xml {  }
      else
        format.html {  }
        format.xml { }
      end

Add redirect_to (:back) between brackets to else format.html{}

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Yes that works, but validation errors dissappear, and I don't want that. Any ideas? –  Brian Roisentul Feb 2 '11 at 21:43
    
a) be sure there is a <p id="notice"><%= notice %></p> somewhere i your view; b) use redirect_to(:back, :notice => 'Something went wrong. Try again') –  Nikita Barsukov Feb 2 '11 at 21:59
    
What about validation error messages? –  Brian Roisentul Feb 2 '11 at 22:24

Ok I solved the problem by doing the following:

1) I created two routes with the same path, but with different conditions method (one it's post and the other one is set to get)

2) I changed the form in order to post to the POST action defined above

3) I added render => :my_action when the validation fails

So that's pretty much it.

Thanks anyway for all your help.

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That's what I've wrote to you. But this is out of the REST ideology. –  fl00r Feb 2 '11 at 22:47

Hidden field. That user ID param has a name by which you extract it in your controller, right? So just put that value in a hidden field of the same name, then it will survive a round-trip.

For example:

<%= hidden_field_tag :referring_user_id, params[:referring_user_id] %>
share|improve this answer
    
it's not about topic problem –  fl00r Feb 3 '11 at 16:30

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