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According to the Java Language Specification, constructors cannot be marked synchronized because other threads cannot see the object being created until the thread creating it has finished it. This seems a bit odd, because I can indeed have another thread view the object while it's being constructed:

public class Test {
    public Test() {
       final Test me = this;
       new Thread() {
           @Override
           public void run() {
               // ... Reference 'me,' the object being constructed
           }
       }.start();
    }
}

I know that this is a pretty contrived example, but it seems in theory that someone could come up with a more realistic case where marking the constructor synchronized would be legitimate in order to prevent races with threads like this one.

My question is this: is there a reason that Java would specifically disallow the synchronized modifier on a constructor? Perhaps my above example is flawed, or perhaps there really is no reason and it's an arbitrary design decision. In either case, I'm really curious and would love to know the answer.

Thanks so much!

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5  
As an aside, it is highly recommended not to allow the "this" reference to escape before the constructor has completed. –  Mike Q Feb 2 '11 at 21:57
    
@Mike Q- I've heard this before but don't fully understand why. Is there a particular reason why? I could see Bad Things happening if you gave out a reference to this before you finished initializing the object, but what if it's the last thing you do in the constructor? –  templatetypedef Feb 2 '11 at 22:03
2  
it is really the subject of another question, but even if it is the last thing you do in the constructor, if the object is subclassed, then the subclass has not finished constructing. If this class is final, and you don't chain constructors (calling this(...)) and do something else after the chain call and it is the last thing you do, its fine. Except of course that any of those decisions could change (you could add a second constructor later). –  Yishai Feb 2 '11 at 22:11
3  
It's much clearer if you quote what the JLS actually says: "There is no practical need for a constructor to be synchronized, because it would lock the object under construction, which is normally not made available to other threads until all constructors for the object have completed their work." –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 2 '11 at 22:18
1  
see ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp0618.html for more details –  Mike Q Feb 2 '11 at 22:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

If you really need synchronization of the rest of the constructor versus any threads which anyhow gets a reference to your not-yet-totally-constructed object, you can use a synchronized-block:

public class Test {
    public Test() {
       final Test me = this;
       synchronized(this) {
          new Thread() {
             @Override
             public void run() {
                // ... Reference 'me,' the object being constructed
                synchronized(me) {
                   // do something dangerous with 'me'.
                }
             }
          }.start();
          // do something dangerous with this
       }
    }
}

Usually it is considered bad style to "give out" your not-yet-constructed object like this, so a synchronized constructor is not necessary.


In some corner cases a synchronized constructor would be useful. Here is a more realistic example, from the discussion of Bozho's answer:

public class SuperClass {

   public SuperClass() {
       new Thread("evil") { public void run() {
          doSomethingDangerous();
       }}).start();
       try {
          Thread.sleep(5000);
       }
       catch(InterruptedException ex) { /* ignore */ }
   }

   public abstract void doSomethingDangerous();

}

public class SubClass extends SuperClass {
    int number;
    public SubClass () {
        super();
        number = 2;
    }

    public synchronized void doSomethingDangerous() {
        if(number == 2) {
            System.out.println("everything OK");
        }
        else {
            System.out.println("we have a problem.");
        }
    }

}

We want that the doSomethingDangerous() method is only called after construction of our SubClass object is complete, e.g. we only want the "everything OK" output. But in this case, when you only can edit your SubClass, you have no chance of achieving this. If the constructor could be synchronized, it would solve the problem.

So, what we learn about this: never do something like I did here in the superclass constructor, if your class is not final - and don't call any non-final methods of your own class from your constructor.

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ahh, beat me to it :) +1 –  Kevin K Feb 2 '11 at 21:56
1  
@Paulo, your example is highly contrived. First, it would be a bad practice to call an abstract method from a constructor, but more importantly, if there was no threading going on the subclass would have exactly the same problem. So syncronized would add what? Support for a highly unlikely case while causing the subclass to anyway have to work around the much more common case in a way that could have worked for both cases. –  Yishai Feb 13 '11 at 2:08
    
@Yishai: You are right, the example is not so realistic. But I've seen classes who publish their own objects in the constructor to other threads (not necesarily in the same class, and not necesarily with a sleep), and then you can have such problems where a synchronized constructor could help. Of course, this method in my example should guard itself for being called from the superclass constructor. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 13 '11 at 2:17

The question has been raised on a discussion list used by the writers of the Java concurrent API and the Java Memory Model. Several answers were given, in particular Hans Boehm replied:

Some of us (myself included IIRC) actually argued during the Java memory model deliberations that synchronized constructors should be allowed. Now I could go either way on it. Client code shouldn't use races to communicate the reference, so it shouldn't matter. But if you don't trust the clients of [your class], I think synchronized constructors could possibly be useful. And that was much of the reasoning behind final field semantics. [...] As David said, you can use synchronized blocks.

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In your example, the constructor is only actually called once from one thread.

Yes, it is possible to get a reference to an incompletely constructed Object (some discussions around double check locking and why it is broken reveal this problem), however, not by calling the constructor a second time.

Syncronized on the constructor would prevent two threads from calling the constructor on the same Object simultaneously, and that is not possible, as it is never possible to call the constructor on an object instance twice, period.

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Downvoter, any reason? –  Yishai Feb 2 '11 at 22:22
4  
I did not downvote, but a possible reason: synchronized on the constructor would not only avoid two threads calling the constructor of the same thread (which is impossible anyway), but also avoid calling a synchronized method of this object (or entering a synchronized block with this object as a parameter) in another thread. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 3 '11 at 0:54

Because synchronized guarantees that actions on the same objects are not to be performed by multiple threads. And when the constructor is called you still don't have the object. It is logically impossible for two threads to access the constructor of the same object.

In your example, even if a method is invoked by the new thread, it is no longer about the constructor - it is about the target method being synchronized or not.

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1  
it's not about the constructor anymore, but about the method in question. –  Bozho Feb 2 '11 at 21:48
3  
They you can do a synchronized(this) {} inside your constructor. Synchronized on the constructor itself is a nonsense. How do you acquire the mutex to an object prior to starting the process of bringing it into existence? –  Affe Feb 2 '11 at 21:50
3  
The JVM code for creating an object is two steps - allocating the object with all fields default-initialized, then calling the constructor. In that interim step it seems perfectly reasonable to set up the object's monitor, which could allow the constructor to be marked synchronized. –  templatetypedef Feb 2 '11 at 22:14
1  
(I was not the downvoter.) The explanation by templatetypedef make sence: If you don't want a synchronized method of your class (or any sub- or superclass) to be executed by another thread before your constructor is finished, and maybe even the superclass constructor publishes your object, you have lost – even a synchronized block in the constructor (like in my answer) does not help, since it does not apply to the superclass constructor. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 3 '11 at 1:04
1  
I think (it was a long time ago) that I meant the following: even if it is two steps: initialization and invoking constructor, and other threads can see the initialized object, they can't invoke the 2nd step on it. On the JVM level they probably can, but you can't express that in Java code –  Bozho Sep 11 '12 at 6:00

I see little reason to forbid constructors to be synchronized. It would be useful in many scenarios in multi-threaded applications. If I understand the Java Memory Model correctly (I read http://jeremymanson.blogspot.se/2008/11/what-volatile-means-in-java.html) the following simple class could have benefited from a synchronized constructor.

public class A {
    private int myInt;

    public /*synchronized*/ A() {
        myInt = 3;
    }

    public synchronized void print() {
        System.out.println(myInt);
    }
}

In theory, I believe a call to print() could print "0". This could happen if an instance of A is created by Thread 1, the reference to the instance is shared with Thread 2, and Thread 2 calls print(). If there is no special synchronization between the write myInt = 3 of Thread 1 and the read of the same field by Thread 2, Thread 2 is not guaranteed to see the write.

A synchronized constructor would fix this issue. Am I right about this?

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(i) the problem you describe is that the instance of A is not properly published, in which case its observed state could be anything indeed (ii) you could write synchronized (this) { myInt = 3; } in your constructor to solve the issue, or mark myInt as final. –  assylias Jan 25 '13 at 15:53
    
You can also mark myInt variable with volatile keyword. –  ponkin Sep 23 at 15:54

Constructor Modifiers section in JLS clearly says

There is no practical need for a constructor to be synchronized, because it would
lock the object under construction, which is normally not made available to other
threads until all constructors for the object have completed their work.

So there is no need for constructor to be synchronized.

Also it is not recommended to give out the objects reference(this) before object is created. One of the possible ambiguous situations would be to give out the objects reference is superclass constructor when subsclass object is being created.

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The following code can achieve the expected result for synchronized constructor.

public class SynchronisedConstructor implements Runnable {

    private int myInt;

    /*synchronized*/ static {
        System.out.println("Within static block");
    }

    public SynchronisedConstructor(){
        super();
        synchronized(this){
            System.out.println("Within sync block in constructor");
            myInt = 3;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        print();
    }

    public synchronized void print() {
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName());
        System.out.println(myInt);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        SynchronisedConstructor sc = new SynchronisedConstructor();

        Thread t1 = new Thread(sc);
        t1.setName("t1");
        Thread t2 = new Thread(sc);
        t2.setName("t2");

        t1.start();
        t2.start();
    }
}
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