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You are given 2 lists of Strings - A and B. Find the shortest regex that matches all strings in A and none in B. Note that this regex can match/not-match other strings that are not in A and not in B. For simplicity, we can assume the that our alphabet size is just 2 characters - 0 and 1. Also only these operators are allowed:

* - 0 or more
? - 0 or 1
+ - 1 or more
() - brackets

For simplicity the regex not operator is not allowed. I don't know if allowing the or operator (|) would simplify the problem or not. A and B ofcourse would have no common elements. Here are some examples:

A=[00,01,10]
B=[11]
answer = 1*0+1*


A=[00,01,11]
B=[10]
answer = 0*1*
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closed as not a real question by Daniel A. White, casperOne Feb 1 '12 at 20:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
This sounds like a fairly difficult problem, an algorithm to produce a fairly short representation is probably not that hard to find, to prove it that it produces the shortes could be tricky though. –  biziclop Feb 2 '11 at 22:04
3  
Interesting that no alternation is permitted. It seems possible to produce "pathological" sets which cannot have regexes generated for them. Say, [0, 00, 0000, 00000] and [000, 0000000]. –  Anon. Feb 2 '11 at 22:18
2  
How do you plan to prove it's the shortest? –  belisarius Feb 2 '11 at 22:28
2  
I am long out of college, this is not homework but thanks for thinking that I can write questions clearly. And, yes, I think its doable but not in any reasonable amount of time. Some simplifications to attack first would be if we can solve this problem without worrying about set B (say we are told B is always empty) or say we are told that not only B is empty but A has only 2 elements. For –  wrick Feb 2 '11 at 22:40
3  
Similar problem and long talk about it: cstheory.stackexchange.com/questions/1854/… –  royas Feb 2 '11 at 23:44

5 Answers 5

One way to solve this is with a genetic algorithm. I happen to have a genetic solver laying around so I applied it to your problem with the following algorithm:

  • get the distinct tokens from the desired inputs as genes
  • add the Regex specials to the genes
  • for the fitness algorithm
    • make sure the generated string is a valid regex
    • get a fitness value based on how many desired things it matches and how many undesired things it matches
  • until a successful Regex is found
    • starting at the number of distinct tokens and incrementing as necessary
    • try to generate a Regex of that length that passes the fitness requirement

Here's my implementation in C#

private static void GenerateRegex(IEnumerable<string> target, IEnumerable<string> dontMatch)
{
    string distinctSymbols = new String(target.SelectMany(x => x).Distinct().ToArray());
    string genes = distinctSymbols + "?*()+";

    Func<string, uint> calcFitness = str =>
        {
            if (str.Count(x => x == '(') != str.Count(x => x == ')'))
            {
                return Int32.MaxValue;
            }
            if ("?*+".Any(x => str[0] == x))
            {
                return Int32.MaxValue;
            }
            if ("?*+?*+".ToArray().Permute(2)
                .Any(permutation => str.IndexOf(new string(permutation.ToArray())) != -1))
            {
                return Int32.MaxValue;
            }
            Regex regex;
            try
            {
                regex = new Regex("^" + str + "$");
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return Int32.MaxValue;
            }
            uint fitness = target.Aggregate<string, uint>(0, (current, t) => current + (regex.IsMatch(t) ? 0U : 1));
            uint nonFitness = dontMatch.Aggregate<string, uint>(0, (current, t) => current + (regex.IsMatch(t) ? 10U : 0));
            return fitness + nonFitness;
        };

    for (int targetGeneLength = distinctSymbols.Length; targetGeneLength < genes.Length * 2; targetGeneLength++)
    {
        string best = new GeneticSolver(50).GetBestGenetically(targetGeneLength, genes, calcFitness, true);
        if (calcFitness(best) != 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("-- not solved with regex of length " + targetGeneLength);
            continue;
        }
        Console.WriteLine("solved with: " + best);
        break;
    }
}

And the result of its application to your samples:

public void Given_Sample_A()
{
    var target = new[] { "00", "01", "10" };
    var dontMatch = new[] { "11" };

    GenerateRegex(target, dontMatch);
}

output:

Generation  1 best: 10 (2)
Generation  2 best: 0+ (2)
Generation  5 best: 0* (2)
Generation  8 best: 00 (2)
Generation  9 best: 01 (2)
-- not solved with regex of length 2
Generation  1 best: 10* (2)
Generation  3 best: 00* (2)
Generation  4 best: 01+ (2)
Generation  6 best: 10+ (2)
Generation  9 best: 00? (2)
Generation 11 best: 00+ (2)
Generation 14 best: 0?1 (2)
Generation 21 best: 0*0 (2)
Generation 37 best: 1?0 (2)
Generation 43 best: 10? (2)
Generation 68 best: 01* (2)
Generation 78 best: 1*0 (2)
Generation 79 best: 0*1 (2)
Generation 84 best: 0?0 (2)
Generation 127 best: 01? (2)
Generation 142 best: 0+1 (2)
Generation 146 best: 0+0 (2)
Generation 171 best: 1+0 (2)
-- not solved with regex of length 3
Generation  1 best: 1*0+ (1)
Generation  2 best: 0+1* (1)
Generation 20 best: 1?0+ (1)
Generation 31 best: 1?0* (1)
-- not solved with regex of length 4
Generation  1 best: 1*00? (1)
Generation  2 best: 0*1?0 (1)
Generation  3 best: 1?0?0 (1)
Generation  4 best: 1?00? (1)
Generation  8 best: 1?00* (1)
Generation 12 best: 1*0?0 (1)
Generation 13 best: 1*00* (1)
Generation 41 best: 0*10* (1)
Generation 44 best: 1*0*0 (1)
-- not solved with regex of length 5
Generation  1 best: 0+(1)? (1)
Generation 36 best: 0+()1? (1)
Generation 39 best: 0+(1?) (1)
Generation 61 best: 1*0+1? (0)
solved with: 1*0+1?

second sample:

public void Given_Sample_B()
{
    var target = new[] { "00", "01", "11" };
    var dontMatch = new[] { "10" };

    GenerateRegex(target, dontMatch);
}

output:

Generation  1 best: 00 (2)
Generation  2 best: 01 (2)
Generation  7 best: 0* (2)
Generation 12 best: 0+ (2)
Generation 33 best: 1+ (2)
Generation 36 best: 1* (2)
Generation 53 best: 11 (2)
-- not solved with regex of length 2
Generation  1 best: 00* (2)
Generation  2 best: 0+0 (2)
Generation  7 best: 0+1 (2)
Generation 12 best: 00? (2)
Generation 15 best: 01* (2)
Generation 16 best: 0*0 (2)
Generation 19 best: 01+ (2)
Generation 30 best: 0?0 (2)
Generation 32 best: 0*1 (2)
Generation 42 best: 11* (2)
Generation 43 best: 1+1 (2)
Generation 44 best: 00+ (2)
Generation 87 best: 01? (2)
Generation 96 best: 0?1 (2)
Generation 125 best: 11? (2)
Generation 126 best: 1?1 (2)
Generation 135 best: 11+ (2)
Generation 149 best: 1*1 (2)
-- not solved with regex of length 3
Generation  1 best: 0*1* (0)
solved with: 0*1*
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, that's very nice. Have you tried bigger sets with longer strings? I am thinking 10 strings with length ~10 in A, and make B empty for simplicity. I wonder how fast it would be then. GA tend to work better when you don't need an exact solution, otherwise they are usually quite inefficient. –  IVlad Feb 3 '11 at 0:40
    
was going to downvote with "Wtf genetic algorithm?" but then saw that it actually... worked... :[ ] –  MK. Feb 3 '11 at 4:13
    
@IVlad No, I haven't tried longer strings. To @MK's point a GA probably would not work for a complex set of inputs. –  Handcraftsman Feb 3 '11 at 16:10

If this was a homework problem, it would be like "one homework, get an A in the class" type. I think there is "or" operator missing somewhere in that question.

There is an obvious solution that is A0|A1|A2|..., but seems like much harder solution when trying to find the shortest.

I would suggest using recursion to try to shorten the regex, but that is not an ideal solution.

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This project generates a regexp from a given list of words: https://github.com/bwagner/wordhierarchy

However, it only uses "|", non-capturing group "(?:)" and option "?".

Sample usage:

java -jar dist/wordhierarchy.jar 00 01 10
-> 10|0(?:1|0)

java -jar dist/wordhierarchy.jar 00 01 11
-> 0(?:0|1)|11

java -jar dist/wordhierarchy.jar 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
-> 1(?:0(?:0|1)|1(?:0|1))|0(?:1(?:1|0)|0(?:1|0))

java -jar dist/wordhierarchy.jar 000 001 010     100 101 110 111
-> 1(?:0(?:0|1)|1(?:1|0))|0(?:10|0(?:1|0))
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"When in doubt, use brute force."

import re

def learn(ayes, noes, max_size=7):
    def is_ok(rx):
        rx += '$'
        return (all(re.match(rx, s) for s in ayes)
                and not any(re.match(rx, s) for s in noes))
    return find(find(gen_sized(size), is_ok)
                for size in range(max_size + 1))

def find(xs, ok=lambda x: x):
    for x in xs:
        if ok(x):
            return x

def gen_sized(size):
    if 0 == size:
        yield ''
    if 0 < size:
        for rx in gen_sized(size-1):
            yield rx + '0'
            yield rx + '1'
            if rx and rx[-1] not in '*?+':
                yield rx + '*'
                yield rx + '?'
                yield rx + '+'
    if 5 < size:
        for rx in gen_sized(size-3):
            yield '(%s)*' % rx
            yield '(%s)?' % rx
            yield '(%s)+' % rx

This produces a different but equally good answer for the first one: 0*1?0*. It looks at 1241 trial regexes to solve the two test cases (total).

The search has a size limit -- since the general-regex version of this problem is NP-hard, any program for it is going to run into trouble on complex-enough inputs. I'll cop to not having really thought about this simplified problem. I'd love to see some neat less-obvious answers.

share|improve this answer
    
But it doesn't work for learn(("0","00","0000","00000"),("000","000000")) –  royas Feb 3 '11 at 7:37
    
@royas, what's your expected answer? –  Darius Bacon Feb 3 '11 at 8:49
    
sth like this: (((0?00)?0)?0 –  royas Feb 3 '11 at 9:52
    
@royas, that matches "000", one of the noes. –  Darius Bacon Feb 3 '11 at 20:01
    
There's no answer with max_size <= 15 -- at least according to my code. This one probably needs the '|' operator. –  Darius Bacon Feb 3 '11 at 20:48

The premise fails on the second example.

A=[00,01,11]
B=[10]
answer = 0*1*

/0*1*/ matches '10' from B, specifically it matches '1'

If you include anchors /^0*1*$/ it doesen't match '00' from A

Are there more conditions included?

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1  
How does 0*1* match 10 ?? The X* operator here is not wild-card operator, it means repeat X zero or more times. Please read the question description again. –  wrick Feb 2 '11 at 23:13
1  
@wrick: No, he is right. If the regex is not applied with anchors (which happens implicitly in some environments), it will match the "1". Still, it should be a comment instead of an answer –  Bergi Oct 22 '12 at 13:28

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