Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array with config data outside from my class and need very often values from this array inside my classes. What is the cleanest way to get this values in my class?

<?

$config["deco"] = "dark";

class Car {

    private $color;

    public function getColor() {
        return $this->color;
    }

    public function setColor($color) {
        $this->color = $config["deco"].' '.$color;
        // here I need a value from $config
    }

    public function __toString() {
        return "My car is ".$this->getColor()."\n";
    } 

}

$car = new Car();
$car->setColor("blue");
echo $car; // "My car is dark blue";
share|improve this question
    
Your class looks fine as is. Please explain your UseCase and give an example $config array and how you want to work with it in the class. –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 22:17
    
there is a comment in setColor() there I need $config which is outside the class defined. –  bees Feb 2 '11 at 22:21
    
Have you looked at define()? –  Jake N Feb 2 '11 at 22:22
    
do I have access from inside the class with define()? The $config isn't inside the class. –  bees Feb 2 '11 at 22:29
    
Well, pass it into the class then –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 23:03

4 Answers 4

Is this what your looking for?

$config = array('deco' => 'foo', …

$car = new Car();

$car->setColor($config['deco'] . 'blue');
echo $car; // My car is fooblue

class Car {
    private $color;

    public function getColor() {
        return $this->color;
    }

    public function setColor($color) {
        $this->color = $color;
    }

    public function __toString() {
        return "My car is ".$this->getColor()."\n";
    } 

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but sorry not what I need, I updated my foolish question :) –  bees Feb 2 '11 at 22:37

Two ways to do this - you could use the global keyword in the function that needs the config:

public function setColor($color) {
    global $config;

    $this->color = $config["deco"].' '.$color;
    // here I need a value from $config
}

Or, my preferred method, is to have the config as a class where the values are statically available:

$config["deco"] = "dark";
class Config
{
  static $values = array(
    "deco" => "dark",
  );

  public static function get($name)
  {
    if (isset(self::$values[$name])) {
      return self::$values[$name];
    }
    return null;
  }
}

class Car {

    private $color;

    public function getColor() {
        return $this->color;
    }

    public function setColor($color) {
        $this->color = Config::get("deco").' '.$color;
        // here I need a value from $config
    }

    public function __toString() {
        return "My car is ".$this->getColor()."\n";
    } 

}

I actually have all of my config in an ini type file - and the Config class parses that ini file to build the array of data which is then accessed like above... but I leave that as an exercise to the reader

share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly good practice. Using the global keyword breaks encapsulation and couples to the global scope. Using the static class does the same and hardcodes a dependency on the Config class into Car. This is not maintainable and it's hard to test. –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 23:06
    
global no way but the static idea is nice thanks! –  bees Feb 2 '11 at 23:11
    
@bees statics are - for any practical purpose - the same as globals –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 23:15
    
Personally, I avoid using global - but I don't know how you can say using static classes isn't maintainable - it's been a pattern that I used with my colleagues at my last job for several years. –  HorusKol Feb 2 '11 at 23:58
    
@Horus then it's time to stop it ;) Static Methods are death to testability. Like I said, statics are effectively oo globals. –  Gordon Feb 4 '11 at 8:33

ok found a similar question Best way to access global objects (like Database or Log) from classes and scripts?

my favorite is the Dependency-Injection http://components.symfony-project.org/dependency-injection/trunk/book/01-Dependency-Injection

share|improve this answer
    
Dependency Injection is what @Phill suggested –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 23:11
    
And as the answers to that question point out - dependency injection is not without its own issues –  HorusKol Feb 3 '11 at 0:01
    
@Horus all the suggested solutions have "their own issues", but DI is the solution with the least issues. –  Gordon Feb 4 '11 at 8:37

Your config options are going to be unique across your application, so there should only be 1 copy of them somewhere.

If you're including everywhere a file that includes the $config array in the global scope, then the dirtiest (and quickest) way to get to it inside a class would be by using $GLOBALS['config']["deco"].

However you may find it more useful to encapsulate your configuration values inside a class, either as a static variable:

class Config {

    public static $config = array(
       'deco' => 'dark' 
    ) ;

}

whereupon you access it as Config::$config['deco'], or as a Singleton class:

class Config {

    private static $_instance = null ;

    public $config = array(
       'deco' => 'dark' 
    ) ;

    public static function getInstance() {

        if (self::$_instance == null || !self::$_instance instanceOf Config) {
            self::$_instance = new Config() ;
        }

        return self::$_instance ;
    }

}

where you'd then use Config::getInstance()->config["deco"]

Both those ways give you flexibility to build upon the functionality for fetching, storing, caching config values, as well as defensive coding by making sure a config value actually exists when attempting to access it, returning default values etc. You can also ofcourse add functions to the classes to make the "get" syntax shorter.

share|improve this answer
    
Singletons have no use in PHP. There is no application server where objects live in shared memory and if you want to make sure there is just one instance, then dont instantiate a second one. –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 23:17
1  
@Gordon absolutely, it gives you no performance increase, but it stores in a single place the instance for use within the same request without too much hassle. I see your point however, and am taking this opportunity to stop postponing reading more about Dependency Injection. –  Fanis Feb 2 '11 at 23:34
    
That's the spirit! :) I've written a blog post about the uselessness of Singletons recently at gooh.posterous.com/singletons-in-php in case you are interested. –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 23:38
    
@Gordon sure, opened it along with the other 20 or so links I found in that other SO question on the matter :) –  Fanis Feb 2 '11 at 23:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.