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I have just installed phpMyAdmin on my new Fedora Core 10 dedicated server.

I downloaded the phpMyAdmin-3.1.2-english.tar.gz. I extracted it and placed it in this folder /opt/phpMyAdmin-3.1.2-english and i created a symbolic link in the /var/www/html directory so that I can access it like this: http://www.mydomainname.com/webdb.

When I point my browser to that URL it asks me to login and I can only login using localhost as username and a blank password. So I thought I would change it and follow some web tutorials that suggest to change these lines:

$cfg['Servers'][$i]['auth_type'] = ‘http’; 
$cfg['Servers'][$i]['user'] = ‘USERNAME’;
$cfg['Servers'][$i]['password'] = ‘PASSWORD’;

However, these lines do not even exist in my config.inc.php!!! I have done this install before and I remember these files being there but not with this isntall.

I tried adding those lines and that didn't make a difference.

Has phpMyAdmin changed their config files or have i installed incorrectly??

Thank you for any help!

EDIT

I managed to remove that one and use a "yum install phpMyAdmin" and the config file here works fine! :)

However, I am still unable to access phpMyAdmin using the password and username that I suggest in the config.inc.php. Does this mean that the username and password I suggest is config.inc.php is not in line with the MySQL server username and password?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Would setting

$cfg['Servers'][$i]['auth_type'] = 'config';

instead of

$cfg['Servers'][$i]['auth_type'] = ‘http’;

help?

See http://www.un4given.nl/phpMyAdmin/Documentation.html#config for more information.

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