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Here is some actual code I'm trying to debug:

BEGIN
            OPEN bservice (coservice.prod_id);

            FETCH bservice
            INTO  v_billing_alias_id, v_billing_service_uom_id, v_summary_remarks;

            CLOSE bservice;

            v_service_found := 1;
        -- An empty fetch is expected for some services.
        EXCEPTION
            WHEN OTHERS THEN
                v_service_found := 0;
        END;

When the parametrized cursor bservice(prod_id) is empty, it fetches NULL into the three variables and does not throw an exception.

So whoever wrote this code expecting it to throw an exception was wrong, right? The comment seems to imply that and empty fetch is expected and then it sets a flag for later handling, but I think this code cannot possibly have been tested with empty sets either.

Obviously, it should use bservice%NOTFOUND or bservice%FOUND or similar.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When the parametrized cursor bservice(prod_id) is empty, it fetches NULL into the three variables and does not throw an exception.

Wrong

When t is empty, it fetches nothing, and does not overwrite any value.

declare

  cursor c(dt in date) is 
    select dummy from dual 
     where dt > sysdate;

  dummy_ dual.dummy%type;

begin

  open c(sysdate + 2);
  fetch c into dummy_;
  close c;
  dbms_output.put_line('1: ' || dummy_);

  open c(sysdate - 2);
  fetch c into dummy_;
  close c;
  dbms_output.put_line('2: ' || dummy_);

end;
/

prints

1: X
2: X

So whoever wrote this code expecting it to throw an exception was wrong, right? Yes

Obviously, it should use bservice%NOTFOUND or bservice%FOUND or similar. Yes

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Nyffenegger Right, it basically works just like SQL Server. I think the FETCH not overwriting the variables is why this bug wasn't detected. Not sure why a cursor was used in the first place anyway, since you could just select into the variables, or right into the update... –  Cade Roux Feb 3 '11 at 15:12

If you want to know if the cursor returned any result, use the %FOUND cursor attribute:

        OPEN bservice (coservice.prod_id);

        FETCH bservice
        INTO  v_billing_alias_id, v_billing_service_uom_id, v_summary_remarks;

        -- An empty fetch is expected for some services.
        IF (bservice%FOUND) THEN
          v_service_found := 1;
        ELSE
          v_service_found := 0;
        END IF

        CLOSE bservice;

from cursor attributes

%FOUND
  • Returns INVALID_CURSOR if cursor is declared, but not open; or if cursor has been closed.
  • Returns NULL if cursor is open, but fetch has not been executed
  • Returns TRUE if a successful fetch has been executed
  • Returns FALSE if no row was returned.
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