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I'm working on learning MongoDB. Language of choice for the current run at it is Groovy.

Working on Group Queries by trying to answer the question of which pet is the most needy one.

Below is my first attempt and it's awful. Any help cleaning this up (or simply confirming that there isn't a cleaner way to do it) would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

package mongo.pets

import com.gmongo.GMongo
import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject
import com.mongodb.DBObject

class StatsController {

  def dbPets = new GMongo().getDB('needsHotel').getCollection('pets')

  //FIXME OMG THIS IS AWFUL!!!
  def index = {
    def petsNeed = 'a walk'

    def reduce = 'function(doc, aggregator) { aggregator.needsCount += doc.needs.length }'
    def key = new BasicDBObject()
    key.put("name", true)
    def initial = new BasicDBObject()
    initial.put ("needsCount", 0)

    def maxNeeds = 0
    def needyPets = []
    dbPets.group(key, new BasicDBObject(), initial, reduce).each {
      if (maxNeeds < it['needsCount']) {
        maxNeeds = it['needsCount']
        needyPets = []
        needyPets += it['name']
      } else if (maxNeeds == it['needsCount']) {
        needyPets += it['name']
      }
    }

    def needyPet = needyPets

    [petsNeedingCount: dbPets.find([needs: petsNeed]).count(), petsNeed: petsNeed, mostNeedyPet: needyPet]
  }

}
share|improve this question
    
What's awful about this - the performance ? – harmanjd Feb 3 '11 at 1:06
    
Implementation. There's so much noise. new BasicDBObject().put would even make it better now that I'm looking at it. Also, getting the maxima of the group query is going to be an in memory operation. What if this was millions of items? I'd want it all to happen at the DB level. – Tim Visher Feb 3 '11 at 17:22
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It should be possible to be change the whole method to this (but I don't have MongoDB to test it)

def index = {
  def petsNeed = 'a walk'

  def reduce = 'function(doc, aggregator) { aggregator.needsCount += doc.needs.length }'

  def key     = [ name: true    ] as BasicDBObject
  def initial = [ needsCount: 0 ] as BasicDBObject

  def allPets = dbPets.group( key, new BasicDBObject(), initial, reduce )
  def maxNeeds = allPets*.needsCount.collect { it as Integer }.max()
  def needyPet = allPets.findAll { maxNeeds == it.needsCount as Integer }.name

  [petsNeedingCount: dbPets.find([needs: petsNeed]).count(), petsNeed: petsNeed, mostNeedyPet: needyPet]
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is indeed a far groovier way of writing the code. There is one slight error. As far as matching the behaviour of the original code snippet, you need an extra line. needyPet = needyPet.collect { it['name'] } to just include the names of the needy pets in the sequence. That being said, it's still an awful way to do it, don't you think? you're entirely in memory? I'm able to do this at the console entirely on the DB end using javascript with things like sort and limit. What I really want is sort and limit capabilities in the groovy code. – Tim Visher Feb 3 '11 at 22:57
    
Ahhh, yeah, fixed the bug now ;-) Yeah, I agree that it's all in memory so could be problematic... I wish you'd said that was your issue when you posted the question though... Why not just execute the queries you'd execute on the command line through the api? – tim_yates Feb 4 '11 at 8:43
    
How do you mean? Via """...""".exec()? That seems very hacky. Is there a performant way to execute direct commands through Java? – Tim Visher Feb 10 '11 at 14:02

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