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This question is similar to my last one, with one difference to make the toy script more similar to my actual one.

Here is the toy script, replace.pl (Edit: now with 'use strict;', etc)

#! /usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;

open(REPL, "<", $ARGV[0]) or die "Couldn't open $ARGV[0]: $!!";
my %replacements;
while(<REPL>) {
   chomp;
   my ($orig, $new, @rest) = split /,/;
   # Processing+sanitizing of orig/new here
   $replacements{$orig} = $new;
}
close(REPL) or die "Couldn't close '$ARGV[0]': $!";

print "Performing the following replacements\n";
while(my ($k,$v) = each %replacements) {
   print "\t$k => $v\n";
}

open(IN, "<", $ARGV[1]) or die "Couldn't open $ARGV[1]: $!!";
while ( <IN> ) {
   while(my ($k,$v) = each %replacements) {
      s/$k/$v/gee;
   }
   print;
}
close(IN) or die "Couldn't close '$ARGV[1]': $!";

So, now lets say I have two files, replacements.txt (using the best answer from the last question, plus a replacement pair that doesn't use substitution):

(f)oo,q($1."ar")
cat,hacker

and test.txt:

foo
cat

When I run perl replace.pl replacements.txt test.txt I would like the output to be

far
hacker

but instead it's '$1."ar"' (too much escaping) but the results are anything but (even with the other suggestions from that answer for the replacement string). The foo turns into ar, and the cat/hacker is eval'd to the empty string, it seems.

So, what changes do I need to make to replace.pl and/or replacements.txt? Other people will be creating the replacements.txt's, so I'd like to make that file as simple as possible (although I acknowledge that I'm opening the regex can of worms on them).

If this isn't possible to do in one step, I'll use macros to enumerate all possible replacement pairs for this particular file, and hope the issue doesn't come up again.

share|improve this question
    
what does it print for the "Performing the following replacements"? –  NebulaFox Feb 3 '11 at 0:16
    
My version prints (f)oo => q($1.ar) cat => hacker –  Nate Parsons Feb 3 '11 at 0:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Please don't give us non-working toy scripts that don't use strict and warnings. Because one of the first things people will do in debugging is to turn those on, and you've just caused work.

Second tip, use the 3-argument version of open rather than the 2-argument version. It is safer. Also in your error checking do as perlstyle says (see http://perldoc.perl.org/perlstyle.html for the full advice) and include the file name and $!.

Anyways your problem is that the code you were including was q($1."ar"). When executed this returns the string $1."ar". Get rid of the q() and it works fine. BUT it causes warnings. That can be fixed by moving the quoting into the replace script, and out of the original script.

Here is a fixed script for you:

#! /usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;

open(REPL, "<", $ARGV[0]) or die "Couldn't open '$ARGV[0]': $!!";
my %replacements;
while(<REPL>) {
   chomp;
   my ($orig, $new) = split /,/;
   # Processing+sanitizing of orig/new here
   $replacements{$orig} = '"' . $new . '"';
}
close(REPL) or die "Couldn't close '$ARGV[0]': $!";

print "Performing the following replacements\n";
while(my ($k,$v) = each %replacements) {
   print "\t$k => $v\n";
}

open(IN, "<", $ARGV[1]) or die "Couldn't open '$ARGV[1]': $!!";
while ( <IN> ) {
   while(my($k,$v) = each %replacements) {
      s/$k/$v/gee;
   }
   print;
}
close(IN) or die "Couldn't close '$ARGV[1]': $!";

And the modified replacements.txt is:

(f)oo,${1}ar
cat,hacker
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thank you very much! I thought by removing the stricts, I'd be making the script shorter and easier to understand, but I realize most people will be trying to figure it out in their browser. (and I'll use the 3-arg open from now on). The script you gave works for me when there is a substitution, but not for cat/hacker. Should I just check $k for parentheses (which for my input will only happen when there's a substitution) and run s///g instead of s///gee? –  Nate Parsons Feb 3 '11 at 0:36
1  
@drhorrible: What do you mean it doesn't work for cat/hacker? Here on my machine it is working on both. –  btilly Feb 3 '11 at 1:06
    
@drhorrible, you have to quote all of the replacement side if you keep the /ee. That means cat,"hack" and (f)oo,$1."ar" or (f)oo,"${1}ar" otherwise its a error. It can be either single or double quote for interpolation or any form of catenation. –  sln Feb 3 '11 at 1:13
    
This is a very interesting question. Can I ask one more thing - why exactly doesn't \1ar works in the replacement file, no matter how hard I try? –  Karel Bílek Feb 3 '11 at 1:17
    
@drhorrible, just use @btilly code, he quotes the replacement text automatically after its read in after split(). This will limit your form to (f)oo,${1}ar style, so it becomes "${1}ar" and cat,hacker becomes "hacker". –  sln Feb 3 '11 at 1:33

Get rid of the q() in the replacement string;

Should be just
(f)oo,$1."ar"
as in ($k,$v) = split /,/, $_;

Warning: using external input data in evals is very, very dangerous

Or, just make it
(f)oo,"${1}ar"

No modification to the code is necessary either way e.g. s///gee.

Edit @drhorrible, if it doesen't work then you have other problems.

use strict;use warnings;

my $str = "foo";
my $repl = '(f)oo,q(${1}."ar")';
my ($k,$v) = split /,/, $repl;
$str =~ s/$k/$v/gee;
print $str,"\n";

$str = "foo";
$repl = '(f)oo,$1."ar"';
($k,$v) = split /,/, $repl;
$str =~ s/$k/$v/gee;
print $str,"\n";

$str = "foo";
$repl = '(f)oo,"${1}ar"';
($k,$v) = split /,/, $repl;
$str =~ s/$k/$v/gee;
print $str,"\n";

output:
${1}."ar"
far
far

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't work for me, either (and I agree on eval'ing input data in general, but in this case, only trusted people will have access to this script, and if they were to try any funny business, I'm sure it would be caught by other safeguards, systems would be restored from backups as necessary, and the individual would be fired) –  Nate Parsons Feb 3 '11 at 0:40
    
@drhorrible, it works for me, see my post. The eval is very dangerous in this context and imho joe sixpack should not be writing regex's. –  sln Feb 3 '11 at 1:02

You have introduced one more level of interpolation since the last question. You can get the right result by either:

  1. Lay a 3rd "e" modifier on your substitution

    s/$k/$v/geee;    # eeek
  2. Remove a layer of interpolation in replacements.txt by making the first line

    (f)oo,$1."ar"
share|improve this answer
    
The second doesn't actually work: String found where operator expected at (eval 1) line 1, near "ar""" Not trying the first since I agree with the 'eeek' –  Nate Parsons Feb 3 '11 at 0:34
    
@drhorrible, actually it does work. He meant remove a layer e.g. subtract a /e from /geee. So it becomes s/$k/$v/gee –  sln Feb 3 '11 at 0:41

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