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I want to extract around 20 element types from some SVG documents to form a new SVG. rect, circle, polygon, text, polyline, basically a set of visual parts are in the white list. JavaScript, comments, animations and external links need to go.

Three methods come to mind:

  1. Regex: I'm completely familiar with, and would rather not go there obviously.
  2. PHP DOM: Used once perhaps a year ago.
  3. XSLT: Took my first look just now.

If XSLT is the right tool for the job, what xsl:stylesheet do I need? Otherwise, which approach would you use?

Example input:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<!-- Created with Inkscape (http://www.inkscape.org/) -->
<svg xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1" width="512" height="512" id="svg2">
<title>Mostly harmless</title>
  <metadata id="metadata7">Some metadata</metadata>

<script type="text/ecmascript">
<![CDATA[
alert('Hax!');
]]>
</script>
<style type="text/css">
<![CDATA[ svg{display:none} ]]>
</style>

  <defs id="defs4">
    <circle id="my_circle" cx="100" cy="50" r="40" fill="red"/> 
  </defs>

  <g id="layer1">
  <a xlink:href="www.hax.ru">
    <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="20" y="20"/>
    <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="100" y="50"/>
  </a>
  </g>
  <text>
    <tspan>It was the best of times</tspan>
    <tspan dx="-140" dy="15">It was the worst of times.</tspan>
  </text>
</svg>

Example output. Displays exactly the same image:

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" width="512" height="512">
  <defs>
    <circle id="my_circle" cx="100" cy="50" r="40" fill="red"/> 
  </defs>
  <g id="layer1">
    <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="20" y="20"/>
    <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="100" y="50"/>
  </g>
  <text>
    <tspan>It was the best of times</tspan>
    <tspan dx="-140" dy="15">It was the worst of times.</tspan>
  </text>
</svg>

The approximate list of keeper elements is: g, rect, circle, ellipse, line, polyline, polygon, path, text, tspan, tref, textpath, linearGradient+stop, radialGradient, defs, clippath, path.

If not specifically SVG tiny, then certainly SVG lite.

share|improve this question
    
XSLT is likely the right tool for the job. If you can provide a brief sample and describe what you want to redact or keep, you would likely get an answer with an XSLT to get you started. –  Mads Hansen Feb 3 '11 at 0:48
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete solution that produces exactly the wanted output and for an extensive explanation. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 3 '11 at 5:38
    
Extra context: If the SVG was like a forum page, you'd naturally only allow people a small subset of HTML, otherwise all sorts of scripting and vandalism would get though. This is a shared SVG document, which is conceptually just like a web forum. –  SamG Feb 3 '11 at 5:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Dimitre Novatchev's solution is more "clean" and elegant, but if you need a "whitelist" solution (because you can't predict what content users may input that you would need to "blacklist"), then you would need to fully flesh out the "whitelist".

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0"
    xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
    <xsl:output indent="yes" />

    <!--The "whitelist" template that will copy matched nodes forward and apply-templates
        for any attributes or child nodes -->
    <xsl:template match="svg:svg 
        | svg:defs  | svg:defs/text()
        | svg:g  | svg:g/text()
        | svg:a  | svg:a/text()
        | svg:use   | svg:use/text()
        | svg:rect  | svg:rect/text()
        | svg:circle  | svg:circle/text()
        | svg:ellipse  | svg:ellipse/text()
        | svg:line  | svg:line/text()
        | svg:polyline  | svg:polyline/text()
        | svg:polygon  | svg:polygon/text()
        | svg:path  | svg:path/text()
        | svg:text  | svg:text/text()
        | svg:tspan  | svg:tspan/text()
        | svg:tref  | svg:tref/text()
        | svg:textpath  | svg:textpath/text()
        | svg:linearGradient  | svg:linearGradient/text()
        | svg:radialGradient  | svg:radialGradient/text()
        | svg:clippath  | svg:clippath/text()
        | svg:text | svg:text/text()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:copy-of select="@*" />
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()" />
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <!--The "blacklist" template, which does nothing except apply templates for the 
        matched node's attributes and child nodes -->
    <xsl:template match="@* | node()">
        <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()" />
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's excellent. What does the svg:*/@* match? –  SamG Feb 3 '11 at 2:20
    
It matches the attributes attached to any element bound to the SVG namespace. –  Mads Hansen Feb 3 '11 at 2:32
    
I thought I understood this, but when I removed "svg:a |" from the list, I get an error. "Attribute nodes must be added before any child nodes to an element." I used xsltproc to do the actual processing. –  SamG Feb 3 '11 at 3:13
    
Also I guess it needs a text() somewhere, since it's discarding all text nodes. –  SamG Feb 3 '11 at 3:28
1  
Copying the attributes of an element that isn't itself copied seems questionable to me. They will either end up on the "wrong" element, or they will cause a failure because text nodes have already been written to the parent element. –  Michael Kay Feb 3 '11 at 9:12

This transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:s="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"
 >
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="*">
  <xsl:element name="{name()}" namespace="{namespace-uri()}">
   <xsl:copy-of select="namespace::xlink"/>

   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:element>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="@*">
  <xsl:attribute name="{name()}"
                 namespace="{namespace-uri()}">
   <xsl:value-of select="."/>
  </xsl:attribute>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="s:a">
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match=
 "s:title|s:metadata|s:script|s:style|
  s:svg/@version|s:svg/@id"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<!-- Created with Inkscape (http://www.inkscape.org/) -->
<svg xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
     xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#"
     xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
     xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"
     xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"
     xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1"
     width="512" height="512" id="svg2">
    <title>Mostly harmless</title>
    <metadata id="metadata7">Some metadata</metadata>
    <script type="text/ecmascript"><![CDATA[ alert('Hax!'); ]]></script>
    <style type="text/css"><![CDATA[ svg{display:none} ]]></style>
    <defs id="defs4">
        <circle id="my_circle" cx="100" cy="50" r="40" fill="red"/>
    </defs>
    <g id="layer1">
        <a xlink:href="www.hax.ru">
            <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="20" y="20"/>
            <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="100" y="50"/>
        </a>
    </g>
    <text>
        <tspan>It was the best of times</tspan>
        <tspan dx="-140" dy="15">It was the worst of times.</tspan>
    </text>
</svg>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" width="512" height="512">
   <defs id="defs4">
      <circle id="my_circle" cx="100" cy="50" r="40" fill="red"/>
   </defs>
   <g id="layer1">
      <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="20" y="20"/>
      <use xlink:href="#my_circle" x="100" y="50"/>
   </g>
   <text>
      <tspan>It was the best of times</tspan>
      <tspan dx="-140" dy="15">It was the worst of times.</tspan>
   </text>
</svg>

Explanation:

  1. Two templates, having combined effect that is similar to the identity rule, match all "white-listed nodes and essentially copy them (only eliminating unwanted namespace nodes).

  2. A template with no body matches all "black-listed" nodes (elements and some attributes). These are effectively deleted.

  3. There must be templates that match specific "grey-listed" nodes (the template matching s:a in our case). A "grey-listed node will not be deleted completely -- it may be renamed or otherwize modified, or at least its contents may still be included in the output.

  4. It is likely that with your understanding of the problem becoming more and more clear, the three lists will continuously grow, so the match pattern for the black-list deleting template will be modified to accomodate the newly discovered black-listed elements. Newly-discovered white-listed nodes require no work at all. Only treating new grey-listed elements (if such are found at all) will require a little bit more work.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it works. Though it blacklists rather than white lists. –  SamG Feb 3 '11 at 5:41
    
@SamG: This reminds me about what the optimist and the pessimist said about the half-full (I am an optimist :) ) mug of beer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 3 '11 at 5:44
    
@SamG: I added more to the explanation. –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 3 '11 at 5:44
    
Your result contains <a xlink:href="www.hax.ru"> which should have been filtered. That proves the futility of blacklisting. Good plain english explanations though. –  SamG Feb 3 '11 at 5:55
    
@SamG: No the solution is sound, I simply hadn't seen the a element. Fixed now -- do have a look, and we now have one example of processing a grey-listed element. –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 3 '11 at 6:09

svgfig is a good tool for this job. You can load SVG files and pick out parts you like to make a new document. Or you can just remove parts you don't like and re-save.

share|improve this answer

As an alternative to the accepted XSLT answer, you could use Ruby and Nokogiri:

require 'nokogiri'
svg = Nokogiri::XML( IO.read( "myfile.svg" ) )
svg.xpath( '//*[not(name()="rect" or name()="circle" or ...)]' ).each do |node|
  node.remove
end
File.open( "myfile_clean.svg", "w" ) do |file|
  file << svg.to_xml
end
share|improve this answer

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