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I am using Ruby on Rails 3 and I have this situation:

In a controller I have

# first statement
if a == true
  flag = true
end

# second statement
if flag == true
  // code1
else
  // code2
end

If a is false, what happens in the if statement without having initialized the flag variable? That is, is the flag variable "always"/"in any case" set to NOT TRUE?

Is it a safe approach?

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Did you mean to use a capital A? Something starting with a capital letter is a constant. –  Mike Bethany Feb 3 '11 at 1:22
    
You have right! It is a variable!!! Sorry, I will update the question. –  user502052 Feb 3 '11 at 1:38
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

An unassigned variable is equal to nil but constants work a little differently. With a variable anything other than nil or false will evaluate to true. With a constant you need to use definded?(CONSTANT) so your code would look like this:

# first statement
flag = A if defined?(A)

# second statement
if flag
  puts "Code 1"
else
  puts "Code 2"
end

# Or if you don't need the flag variable
if defined?(A) && A
  puts "Code 1"
else
  puts "Code 2"
end

Output:

Code 2
Code 2
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Just to know, I updated just a little bit the question after the @Mike Bethany comment. –  user502052 Feb 3 '11 at 1:39
    
Ah, OK, that's what I thought but didn't want to assume. In that case the flag variable is redundant and you can just test if a. –  Mike Bethany Feb 3 '11 at 1:43
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You can try this sort of thing out in irb:

>> if false
>>   foo = "bar"
>>   end
=> nil
>> foo
=> nil

So you can see that even though the if condition is false, the foo variable is introduced (it is nil, which will be treated the same as false in your if, so you are safe). I suspect that this is because if statements don't introduce a new scope. See:

>> if true
>>   bar = "baz"
>>   end
=> "baz"
>> bar
=> "baz"

One final thought: If A is really just a boolean, you could set flag = A and avoid the if altogether.

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Just to know, I updated just a little bit the question after the @Mike Bethany comment. –  user502052 Feb 3 '11 at 1:40
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