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Until now, I've been handling extensions by defining a placeholder element that has "name" and "value" attributes as shown in the below example

<root>
   <typed-content>
      ...
   </typed-content>
   <extension name="var1" value="val1"/>
   <extension name="var2" value="val2"/>
....
</root>

I am now planning to switch to using xsd:any. I'd appreciate if you can help me choose th best approach

  1. What is the value add of xsd:any over my previous approach if I specify processContents="strict"
  2. Can a EAI/ESB tool/library execute XPATH expressions against the arbitrary elements I return
  3. I see various binding tools treating this separately while generating the binding code. Is this this the same case if I include a namespace="http://mynamespace" and provide the schema for the "http://mynamespace" during code gen time?
  4. Is this WS-I compliant?
  5. Are there any gotchas that I am missing?

Thank you

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up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Using <xsd:any processContents="strict"> gives people the ability to add extensions to their XML instance documents without changing the original schema. This is the critical benefit it gives you.
  2. Yes. tools than manipulate the instances don't care what the schema looks like, it's the instance documents they look at. To them, it doesn't really matter if you use <xsd:any> or not.
  3. Binding tools generally don't handle <xsd:any> very elegantly. This is understandable, since they have no information about what it could contain, so they'll usually give you an untyped placeholder. It's up the the application code to handle that at runtime. JAXB is particular (the RI, at least) makes a bit of a fist of it, but it's workable.
  4. Yes. It's perfectly good XML Schema practice, and all valid XML Schema are supported by WS-I
  5. <xsd:any> makes life a bit harder on the programmer, due to the untyped nature of the bindings, but if you need to support arbitrary extension points, this is the way to do it. However, if your extensions are well-defined, and do not change, then it may not be worth the irritation factor.
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@skaffman - on point 1. let us say I use xsd:any with "strict" and with namespace="xyz", and shared the document with my customer. my customer is also performing the validation on the xml i send to him using the same schema. If in future, I add a new element to my instance doc (without adding this to the schema), then how come the validation (because of strict) is not failing eventhough the client is performing validation against the OLD schema? – Pangea Feb 3 '11 at 20:00
1  
@Pangea: Hypothetically, or is this actually happening? – skaffman Feb 3 '11 at 20:18
    
@skaffman - if you are asking about the use case then it is not hypothetical. But if you are asking if the validation is failing or not then yes, it is hypothetical. I am trying to correctly understand the real concept of "strict" validation. excuse me of my ignorance :- ( – Pangea Feb 3 '11 at 20:37
    
@Pangea: "strict" means that schema definitions must exist for the extensions, and the data must validate against those schema. "lax" means that if a schema does exist for the extension, then the data must validate. "skip" means no validation is performed. – skaffman Feb 3 '11 at 20:57
    
@skaffman - if that is the case then adding a new element to the schema should fail the validation on client when we use "strict" right? – Pangea Feb 3 '11 at 21:08

Regarding point 3

Binding tools generally don't handle very elegantly. This is understandable, since they have no information about what it could contain, so they'll usually give you an untyped placeholder. It's up the the application code to handle that at runtime. JAXB is particular (the RI, at least) makes a bit of a fist of it, but it's workable.

This corresponds to the @XmlAnyElement annotation in JAXB. The behaviour is as follows:

@XmlAnyElement - Keep All as DOM Nodes

If you annotate a property with this annotation the corresponding portion of the XML document will be kept as DOM nodes.

@XMLAnyElement(lax=true) - Convert Known Elements to Domain Objects

By setting lax=true, if JAXB has a root type corresponding to that QName then it will convert that chunk to a domain object.

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