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What is the best way to enable log rotation on a Ruby on Rails production app?

Is it by using logrotate on the hosting server or is there a set of options to use when initialising logger from the app?

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I see that there is already an answer on this, but I wanted to ask what your environment is. I use the syslog + logrotate method myself, but obviously the kind of environment (whether dedicated, shared; what kind *ix OS is hosting, or is another, etc.) would have some bearing here. –  ylluminate Sep 22 at 14:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 110 down vote accepted

Option 1: syslog + logrotate

You can configure rails, to use the systems log tools.

An example in config/environments/production.rb.

# Use a different logger for distributed setups
config.logger = SyslogLogger.new

That way, you log to syslog, and can use default logrotate tools to rotate the logs.

Option 2: normal Rails logs + logrotate

Another option is to simply configure logrotate to pick up the logs left by rails. On Ubuntu and Debian that would be, for example, in a file called /etc/logrotate.d/rails_example_com.

/path/to/rails.example.com/tmp/log/*.log {
    weekly
    missingok
    rotate 52
    compress
    delaycompress
    notifempty
    copytruncate
}

As per suggestions below, in Rails it is advised to use copytruncate, to avoid having to restart the Rails app.

Edit: removed "sharedscripts/endscript" since they are not used here and cause problems according to comment. And removed create 640 root adm as per comment suggested.

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1  
In order to use logrotate, should the "config.logger = SyslogLogger.new" line in config/environments/production.rb remain commented out, or should it be uncommented? –  robertwbradford Jun 10 '11 at 15:53
2  
It should remain commented out, so that the log files are written in (for example): /var/www/myrailsapp/current/log/production.log –  Luca Spiller Sep 8 '11 at 15:36
1  
If using the logrotate solution, it's worth @amit-saxena's answer -- suggests use of copytruncate over the create directive. –  Tom Harrison Jr Oct 11 '12 at 1:51
1  
When you use copytruncate, create has no effect, so you should probably remove it from your example –  Michaël Witrant May 4 '13 at 6:13
1  
You may also have to add the line su your_rails_user your_rails_group with the owner and group of your log files (i.e., those of the Rails/Passenger process) or (recent versions of?) logrotate may complain about permissions. –  oseiskar Aug 22 at 13:12

If you are using logrotate then you can choose either of the options shown below by placing a conf file in the /etc/logrotate.d/ directory.

# Rotate Rails application logs based on file size
# Rotate log if file greater than 20 MB
/path/to/your/rails/applicaton/log/*.log {
    size=20M
    missingok
    rotate 52
    compress
    delaycompress
    notifempty
    copytruncate
}

Or

# Rotate Rails application logs weekly
/path/to/your/rails/applicaton/log/*.log {
  weekly
  missingok
  rotate 52
  compress
  delaycompress
  notifempty
  copytruncate
}

Please note that copytruncate makes a backup copy of the current log and then clears the log file for continued writing. The alternative is to use create which will perform the rotation by renaming the current file and then creating a new log file with the same name as the old file. I strongly recommend that you use copytruncate unless you know that you need create. The reason why is that Rails may still keep pointing to the old log file even though its name has changed and they may require restarting to locate the new log file. copytruncate avoids this by keeping the same file as the active file.

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But shouldn't I restart rails everytime logrotate runs? –  lzap Jan 26 '12 at 10:12
2  
Truncate the original log file in place after creating a copy, instead of moving the old log file and optionally creating a new one, It can be used when some program can not be told to close its logfile and thus might continue writing (appending) to the previous log file forever. Note that there is a very small time slice between copying the file and truncating it, so some log- ging data might be lost. When this option is used, the create option will have no effect, as the old log file stays in place. –  lzap Jan 26 '12 at 10:16
1  
You don't need to restart rails if you are using copytruncate because it still points to the same log file. –  amit_saxena Jan 30 '12 at 11:04
    
Does the configuration require you to state when to rotate the logs? such as "weekly" or "size=20M" ? Or can you omit that, in case you only want to run logrotate manually? –  Damainman Aug 7 '13 at 8:54
    
I am not sure if I understood your question correctly, but you need to specify a criterion for auto log rotation. If you don't want it to be automatic, don't put the file in /etc/logrotate.d/ directory, keep it some place else. You could then run logrotate --force $CONFIG_FILE by specifying the config file location to run it manually. –  amit_saxena Aug 7 '13 at 10:53

UPDATE: after implementing this in our application, I learned that as of Rails 3.1 the Logger class is deprecated in favor of BufferedLogger class, which does not support the API noted below. The correct answer does appear to be UNIX logrotate.

The following answer is specific to Rails 3, and is not recommended for Rails 3.1 and above.

Original answer, sadly not relevant... Using UNIX logrotate is usually not necessary, and has the significant disadvantage of having additional system configuration outside of the Rails environment, which creates a dependency, another thing not in source control, lack of visibility and flexibility, etc. -- you know, all those things that Rails is good for :-)

Rails 3 (and perhaps earlier) has a suitable built in log rotation and deletion option. The documentation is horrible, but it's actually simple to use.

Settings are typically in config/environments/production.rb (and development.rb, test.rb, others) on the line starting config.logger. To use the default Rails logger use a line like this

config.logger = Logger.new(config.paths.log.first, 10, 100.megabytes)

This new method takes two confusingly different sets of arguments. The first arg is always the path to the log file.

The one generated with a new Rails app uses two args, the second being a time period string like 'daily' or 'weekly'. But this just leaves the logs lying around. To build up. And then take down your site when the server runs out of disk space. Not that that would ever happen to me...

The three-arg variant shown here is different. In this case, the second arg is a number: the count of logs to retain at rotation -- in this case 10 files. The third arg is the number of bytes to put in the logs before rotating -- in this case 100.megabytes, which means I will have at most 1GB of log files.

And if you want your logs in /var/log with all the others, you can just specify that as the path in the first arg. Have your cake, eat it too.

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I like the simplicity of this solution included in Logger for specifying size and number of files. Perfect for me! –  mydoghasworms Feb 13 '13 at 8:53
    
To bad it doesn't work anymore. See my comment. –  Tom Harrison Jr Feb 13 '13 at 15:41
    
Oh no, OK, that comment was a bit premature. Thanks. –  mydoghasworms Feb 14 '13 at 4:51

Enable to send logs to the loggly using rails logglier as following in my environments/production.rb file. rails version is 4.1.0

RailsApplication::Application.configure do
require 'logglier'
config.logger = Logglier.new(<https://logs-01.loggly.com/inputs/inputkey>)
log.info("hello from logglier")
end
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Please suggest me something what to do... this code is not working –  riya khana May 2 at 4:08
    
Rails version is 4.1.0 & Ruby's version is 2.1.1 –  riya khana May 2 at 4:09

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