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Im trying to get the index number of corresponding characters in a string. I mean a loop does make it possible to treat characters in a string like an 'array' of characters with the string method charAt() and indexOf(), right?

here's the code:

/** ****** WINDOW ONLOAD EVENT HANDLER **************** */
window.onload = function(){
    // DOM elements
    var theButton = document.getElementById('theButton');
    var form = document.formISBN;
    var numberField = document.getElementById('theInput')

    theButton.onclick = function(){
        var number = numberField.value;
        console.log(number)
        controlNr = calculControlNr(number);
        // console.log(controlNr);
    }
}

function calculControlNr(number) {
    number = number.replace(' ','','g');
    number = number.replace('-','','g');
    var sum = 0;
    var sumEven = 0;
    var sumUneven = 0;
    var factor = 3;
    var numberExtract = number.substr(0,11);

    console.log(numberExtract.length)
    for (var i = 0; i < numberExtract.length; i++) {
        console.log(numberExtract.indexOf(numberExtract.charAt(i)));
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Yes, you can loop over the characters in a string and use charAt to retrieve them. Can you be a bit more specific about what your question is? I'd love to help out, but I'm not sure what you're asking. – templatetypedef Feb 3 '11 at 9:01
    
Hi thank you for the warm welcome! My aim is to identify the index number of each character in the string (like you would in an array)so i can take characters out of the string and use those characters for calculation within the loop using parseInt().</br> this way I wanted to view the indexnumbers as console output. THe index numbers are supposed to be 0,1,2,3 but now the console output is something like 7,3,2,2 which fi find a little bizarre. – Immers Feb 3 '11 at 9:12
    
There must be an error somewhere else. If I isolate that loop and give a dummy value to numberExtract, then it works perfectly. – Box9 Feb 3 '11 at 9:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

How about

var numberExtract = number.split('');

console.log(numberExtract.length)
for (var i = 0; i < numberExtract.length; i++) {
    if (i==11) break; // you only wanted the first 11?
    console.log(i+':'+numberExtract[i]);
}

But your code does work anyway. Here is what I did to test it

<script>
/** ****** WINDOW ONLOAD EVENT HANDLER **************** */
window.onload = function(){
    // DOM elements
    var theButton = document.getElementById('theButton');
    var form = document.formISBN;
    var numberField = document.getElementById('theInput')

    theButton.onclick = function(){
        var number = numberField.value;
        alert(number)
        controlNr = calculControlNr(number);
        // alert(controlNr);
    }
}

function calculControlNr(number) {
    number = number.replace(' ','','g');
    number = number.replace('-','','g');
    var sum = 0;
    var sumEven = 0;
    var sumUneven = 0;
    var factor = 3;
    var numberExtract = number.substr(0,11);

    alert(numberExtract.length+':'+numberExtract);
    for (var i = 0; i < numberExtract.length; i++) {
        alert(i+':'+numberExtract.indexOf(numberExtract.charAt(i)));
    }
}
</script>
<form name="formISBN">
<input id="theInput" type="text" value="01234567890-A A" />
<input id="theButton" type="button" value="click"/>
</form>
share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic! Exactly what I was looking for. The 11 limit points to the amount of characters I'm working with since the exercise contains validating ISBN-13 numbers. The 13th number (being index 12) is not a number to calculate with. I'll keep the evolution posted. – Immers Feb 3 '11 at 10:41
    
looks like my basic knowledge of the stock objects and their methods needs some more training. Good to know that split() method turns string into array and not substr(). – Immers Feb 3 '11 at 10:43
    
Yes, but substr (which I never use, I use substring) will work when you use charAt since charAt works on the string you have from substring. My suggestion is easier to understand because you get an actual array from the string - but your code should have worked too – mplungjan Feb 3 '11 at 13:12

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