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The program is as

main()
{
int a=1;
if( a-- > 0)
   prinf("AAAA");
else
   prinf("BBBB");
}

Its output is AAAA and if I use

main()
{
int a=1;
if( (a--) > 0)
   prinf("AAAA");
else
   prinf("BBBB");
}

then why again the output is AAAA. () has more preference then -- .

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1  
Why is this tagged php ? –  Russell Dias Feb 3 '11 at 9:25
    
It might help you to think a-- being implemented as int postInc( int& a ) { int tmp = a; a = a-1; return tmp }, parenthesis do not reevaluate the variable either. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 3 '11 at 9:59
2  
Fun fact: you can also say (a --> 0), the parser doesn't care ;) –  FredOverflow Feb 3 '11 at 10:22
2  
Aaah, C, as large as life. –  Yasir Arsanukaev Feb 3 '11 at 10:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The postfix operator -- has higher precedence than any boolean comparison operator.

What do you expect exactly? a-- always evaluates to the value of a which is decremented after evaluation.

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1  
then it must be decremented the comparison will take place. –  Gaurav Feb 3 '11 at 9:26
7  
If you want decrementation use --a, not a--. --a decrements a and then evaluates to the new value of a. a-- evaluates to the value of a before decrementing it. –  Benoit Feb 3 '11 at 9:27

The postfix -- operator returns the original value of the variable, even after decrementing it.

So yes, a is decremented before the comparison, but the result of the expression a-- is not a, but the value 1.

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+1 Thank you for mentioning the correct order. –  FredOverflow Feb 3 '11 at 10:21
    
no, strictly speaking the increment must not necessarily take place before the comparison. The point where the increment operation itself takes place is only forced to be before the next sequence point, whenever this suits the compiler. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 3 '11 at 10:25
    
@Jens, good point. That explanation is going one level deeper though, I guess I just wanted to emphasise that if you accessed a again before the comparison, a would already be decremented. –  Box9 Feb 3 '11 at 10:32

-- decrements the value of a variable after it is used in the expression.

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1  
And () has nothing to do with that. –  Yasir Arsanukaev Feb 3 '11 at 9:28

The use of parentheses here doesn't have any effect on the code because the order of evaluation is the same with and without the parentheses. You are correct that parentheses have higher precedence than --. However, in this case the parentheses won't change the order of evaluation because you didn't group the operands in a different order than they'd evaluate naturally.

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Here is a link with all the operator's precedence in C++.

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