Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While trying to convert some existing code to support unicode characters this problem popped up. If i try to pass a unicode character (in this case im using the euro symbol) into any of the *wprintf functions it will fail, but seemingly only in xcode. The same code works fine in visual studio and I was even able to get a friend to test it successfully with gcc on linux. Here is the offending code:

wchar_t _teststring[10] = L"";
int _iRetVal = swprintf(_teststring, 10, L"A¥€");

wprintf(L"return: %d\n", _iRetVal);

// print values stored in string to check if anything got corrupted
for (int i=0; i<wcslen(_teststring); ++i) {
    wprintf(L"%d: (%d)\n", i, _teststring[i]);
}

In xcode the call to swprintf will return -1, while in visual studio it will succeed and proceed to print out the correct values for each of the 3 chars (65, 165, 8364).

I have googled long and hard for solutions, one suggestion that has appeared a number of times is using a call such as:

setlocale(LC_CTYPE, "UTF-8");

I have tried various combinations of arguments with this function with no success, upon further investigation it appears to be returning null if i try to set the locale to any value other than the default "C".

I'm at a loss as to what else i can try to solve this problem, and the fact it works in other compilers/platforms just makes it all the more frustrating. Any help would be much appreciated!

EDIT: Just thought i would add that when the swprintf call fails it sets an error code (92) which is defined as:

#define EILSEQ      92      /* Illegal byte sequence */
share|improve this question
1  
Keep your source code as 7-bit ascii and see if that helps. Write "\u03b2" in the strings for instance. –  bobbogo Feb 3 '11 at 12:45
    
No joy, still fails the same way. I don't think theres any problem creating a string with the unicode characters, if i just initialise the string with "A¥€" and read the values they are all correct, it only breaks when passing through the formatting print functions. –  Argh Feb 3 '11 at 13:56

2 Answers 2

If you are using Xcode 4+ make sure you have set an appropriate encoding for your files that contain your strings. You can find the encoding settings on a right pane under "Text Settings" group.

share|improve this answer

It should work if you fetch the locale from the environment:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <wchar.h>
#include <locale.h>

int main(void) {
  setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
wchar_t _teststring[10] = L"";
int _iRetVal = swprintf(_teststring, 10, L"A¥€");

wprintf(L"return: %d\n", _iRetVal);

// print values stored in string to check if anything got corrupted
for (int i=0; i<wcslen(_teststring); ++i) {
    wprintf(L"%d: (%d)\n", i, _teststring[i]);
}

}

On my OS X 10.6, this works as expected with GCC 4.2.1, but when compiled with CLang 1.6, it places the UTF-8 bytes in the result string.

I could also compile this with Xcode (using the standard C++ console application template), but because graphical applications on OS X don't have the required locale environment variables, it doesn't work in Xcode's console. On the other hand, it always works in the Terminal application.

You could also set the locale to en_US.UTF-8 (setlocale(LC_ALL, "en_US.UTF-8")), but that is non-portable. Depending on your goal there may be better alternatives to wsprintf.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm fairly certain thats one of the combinations i have tried, i can't test in xcode until tomorrow but i will give it a go in the morning. –  Argh Feb 3 '11 at 18:54
    
So i gave the code a go, i compiled with GCC directly through the terminal and as you said it works as expected. However it continues to fail as before in xcode. I suppose now the question is how exactly is xcode managing to mangle it? I just finished testing a few different compiler options with no luck so far. –  Argh Feb 4 '11 at 9:05
    
@Argh: the problem is that Xcode, as a graphical application, doesn't have the needed locale environment variables. It should work if you run the program compiled by Xcode from the Terminal. –  Philipp Feb 4 '11 at 13:35
    
Sorry i probably should have mentioned this at the start but the application is actually an iPhone game. Having the characters print correctly into a console is entirely optional really. The main use would be creating and manipulating strings which would then be read char-by-char using the values to draw the correct glyphs on the screen. vswprintf is the function i really need to get working, but all the *wprintf functions seem to be failing in the same manner so i use swprintf as a simple example. –  Argh Feb 4 '11 at 14:38
    
@Philipp: I see what you mean about the console vs terminal, i tried creating a console application in xcode and it does work when run separately while failing when run from xcode. I'm not sure though how this would apply to the iOS app. Perhaps the device is also limited in which locales can be set, am i then doomed to convert everything to objective-c strings? –  Argh Feb 4 '11 at 15:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.