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First of all sorry for the long question, but I couldn't write it any shorter :)

Real world example: we have large roll of paper, which contains small 'stickers' printed on them. Each sticker has a code. First two letters of the code tells us what kind of a sticker this is (sticker that represents new roll, sticker that represents end of current roll, sticker which should go to quality control,... but most of them are normal enumerated stickers).

For example sticker with the code XX0001 means, that after it there should be only normal enumerated codes (like NN0001 to NN9999), always the same number. Code QC0001 tells us, that next 10 codes (from QC0001 to QC0010) should go to quality control.

I designed the application so, that each type of a sticker is its own class - NormalSticker, BadSticker, ControllSticker, QualitySticker,... They all inherit from a SticerBase class, which contains some common data for all of them (quality of the scan, date and time of the scan, content of the code). Instances of these classes are created in a static Parser class, which checkes the code and returns appropriate object back to us.

This all works OK, but now I got to a halt. I have also a Roll class, which has a set of Stickers, implemented as List<StickerBase>. This class has a public AddSticker(StickerBase) method, with which we add stickers to the roll. But this method should contain some logic, for example if we get the code XX001, then next 9999 stickers should be from NN0001 to NN9999. Only option I see here, is to make desicions based on the type of the sticker, like:

public void AddSticker(StickerBase sticker)
{
    if (sticker.GetType().Equals(typeof(StickerNewRoll)))
    {
        // Next 9999 sticker should be in the form of NN0001 to NN9999
    }

    if (sticker.GetType().Equals(typeof(EnumeratedSticker)))
    {
        // Add 9999 stickers to the list, other business logic...
    }

    if (sticker.GetType().Equals(typeof(QualitySticker)))
    {
        // Stop the machine and notify the worker
    }
}

I would be really surprised if this is the right approach. Any ideas?

Edit - possible solution: because for each sticker I know how the next one should look like, I can add new method public Sticker NextStickerShouldLookLike() method to each Sticker class. In the validation logic (similar to Péter Török's answer) I can just check if current sticker is the same as previousSticker.NextStickerShouldLookLike(). The Validate method would have two input parameters - current and previous sticker.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can see debate rages in the other answers, but I'm not sure if it's possible to come to a good solution without examining your example in more depth.

Firstly, you have three classes, the Roll, the Parser creating the stickers and the stickers themselves (divided into the derived classes). Perhaps there's another class implementing some business logic that you haven't mentioned? It might be worth describing...

The first question is: Given that some class is responsible for attaching the stickers to the roll (the Parser class?), can you leave the roll entirely ambivalent to which stickers it's receiving, and place your logic elsewhere? Is the logic of what to do when sticker is of type X really something for the roll to know about, given that it's not the roll that's going out and getting the stickers?

The second is: How polymorphic ARE your stickers? Do they have different methods? Do they have different properties? Or are they similar enough that you can just put a label on a StickerBase class?

The third is: Should it be up to the stickers to tell the roll what to do? I.E. should the roll be calling the method sticker.TellMeWhatToDoNextPlease() (implemented as a virtual method and ovveridden in the derived classes of sticker) - especially as the roll isn't responsible for what people are trying to stick on it. You could ask the same question of the class that's responsible for putting the stickers on the roll. You could train a monkey to do it and let the roll figure it out, or you could put your logic there, (if it's where the stickers are being made it should already know what it's making) and let the roll accept what it's stuck with.

Basically - what controls your process? The roll of paper getting stickers stuck on it, the stickers themselves, or whatever makes and sticks the stickers?

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Do you want to add the set of stickers associated with a specific sticker in a single move, or do you want to validate that stickers added conform to the constraints set by the latest special sticker?

In the first case you could add a polymorphic GetAssociatedStickers() method to your sticker classes, which returns the set of stickers from NN0001 to NN9999 to a sticker with code XX001, etc. Then you can add that set of stickers right after the control sticker.

Update

For validation, you could have a new interface StickerValidator, and a method GetValidator in your sticker classes. Special stickers would return a proper validator object (which could be implemented as an anonymous class or an inner class), while regular stickers would return null. Then AddSticker can be modified to look something like

public void AddSticker(StickerBase sticker)
{
    if (sticker.GetValidator() != null)
    {
        this.validator = sticker.GetValidator();
        // add the sticker to the list
    }
    else
    {
        if (this.validator == null || this.validator.validate(sticker))
        {
            // add the sticker to the list
        }
        else
        {
            // set error state
        }
    }
}
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I get stickers one by one and want to insert (add) them to the current roll also one by one. During the insert, the validation should happen. Forgot to mention - if the validation fails, the insert happens anyway, just the status of the roll object changes to 'Invalid'. –  sventevit Feb 3 '11 at 11:17
    
@_simon_, see my update. –  Péter Török Feb 3 '11 at 11:27
    
+1, good solution. The only change I would do is allow the validator to remove itself (probably by returning an enum like Valid, Invalid, Done). That way, after sticker NN9999, the validator removes itself instead of trying to validate subsequent stickers that it doesn't care about. –  munificent Feb 3 '11 at 16:37
    
@munificent, thanks, very good point indeed, haven't thought about that! How about separating the validation itself from the expiration check though? This way the validator is able to always return Valid after it has expired, so even if the caller fails to remove it, no harm is done. –  Péter Török Feb 3 '11 at 17:20
    
Thanks, I learned a lot! What about my suggested solution (see my last edit in the question)? –  sventevit Feb 4 '11 at 9:00

Having conditional expression based on type is an antipattern, and you are correct in that you should try to avoid it. One of the problem is, for instance, that you will have to update this method whenever you create a new StickerBase sub-class. Another problem is that the method signature signals that a caller can pass any implementation of StickerBase, but in fact only a few are supported.

If possible, place your logic in the Sticker implementations. Have an abstract method in the StickerBase class and override in the sub-classes. This way you only need to make a method call in the AddSticker method and won't have to know about what kind of sticker is added.

If this isn't possible, and you really need to have your code dealing with different types of stickers in your Roll class, you might consider looking into the Visitor pattern. Try to avoid this and go with the first approach if possible, though.

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+1 visitor pattern seems suitable for that purpose. –  ssg Feb 3 '11 at 11:38
    
@ssg, not to me at least (but feel free to prove me wrong :-) –  Péter Török Feb 3 '11 at 14:48
    
@Péter, I wouldn't use Visitor as my first choice either, but if he for some reason needed to keep the Sticker type-dependent logic in the Roll class, Visitor would be one way of avoiding switching on type. –  Andreas Vendel Feb 3 '11 at 15:39
    
@Andreas, I fully agree with your recommendation that Visitor should not be the first choice. And some specific additional (future) requirements may indeed mandate using it. However, in the currently known context, it seems overengineering to me. –  Péter Török Feb 3 '11 at 16:01
    
@Peter, it depends on how much flexibility is needed in the future, I think. It might be overengineering for given scenarios only. –  ssg Feb 6 '11 at 18:10

Create a virtual function GetNextStickerLabel(); and implement it different in any sticker type. As a general rule, if you need to ask what type is an object and take a decision (if) on it there is something wrong in the design.

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Just saw your answer, I got the same idea also :) Thanks! –  sventevit Feb 4 '11 at 9:02
    
I accepted the other answer, because it is a little more detailed... –  sventevit Feb 4 '11 at 9:31

It looks like the Visitor pattern (possibly with Iterator pattern) is a perfect candidate here.

I think that accepting stickers as a first class citizen and creating their own class is already a good start for an elegant solution in your case.

You should first create a visitor interface (or a base class) for your sticker hierarchy.

public interface IStickerVisitor
{
    void Visit(NewRollSticker sticker);
    void Visit(EnumeratedSticker sticker);
    void Visit(QualitySticker sticker);
    //need a method for every kind of sticker here
}

Then you need to add an abstract Accept method to your StickerBase class that takes a Visitor as parameter like below;

public abstract void Accept(IStickerVisitor visitor);

the content of this method in the concrete classes should simply like below;

public abstract void Accept(IStickerVisitor visitor)
{
     visitor.Visit(this);
}

At this point you can create a specific visitor, say StickerRollerVisitor that contains required logic to add stickers to the list you want.

public class StickerRollerVisitor : IStickerVisitor
{
    private RollList rollList;
    public StickerRollerVisitor(RollList list)
    {
        this.rollList = list;
    }
    public void Visit(NewRollSticker sticker)
    {
        // Next 9999 sticker should be in the form of NN0001 to NN9999
    }
    public void Visit(EnumeratedSticker sticker)
    {
        // Add 9999 stickers to the list, other business logic...
    }
    public void Visit(QualitySticker sticker)
    {
        // Stop the machine and notify the worker
    }
}

In this visitor implementation, you can accept a Iterator rather than the original list to walk in (forward, backward, skip etc.) the list with a custom strategy.

After creating a default StickerRollerVisitor in your RollList or accepting the visitor as a constructor parameter, your code may looks like below;

private StickerRollerVisitor rollListStickerVisitor;
public void AddSticker(StickerBase sticker)
{
    sticker.Accept(rollListStickerVisitor)
}

After including this pattern in your design you can use it with many different ways by creating new visitors, so it will be great improvement/addition to your design.

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Although Visitor is certainly an intriguing pattern, I fail to see how this would actually resolve the OP's problem. Moreover, since currently there is only one Visitor candidate, this looks to me like an example of YAGNI. –  Péter Török Feb 3 '11 at 14:46

I would anyway rewrite it in this way:

if (sticker is StickerNewRoll)
{
    // Next 9999 sticker should be in the form of NN0001 to NN9999
}
else if (sticker is EnumeratedSticker)
{
    // Add 9999 stickers to the list, other business logic...
}
else if (sticker is QualitySticker)
{
    // Stop the machine and notify the worker
}

...

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1  
This is the same broken design as before. –  Cody Gray Feb 3 '11 at 11:24
    
but at least it looks nicer –  Matt Ellen Feb 3 '11 at 11:35
    
who voted my answer -1 !!? I disagree with the negative vote, it was not supposed to be the full answer but I wanted to point out how to use "is" instead of GetType and typeof... –  Davide Piras Feb 3 '11 at 11:56
    
@Davide I've up-voted you because it's good to teach others about better practices :) (I wasn't the one who down-voted you eh!) –  Matías Fidemraizer Feb 3 '11 at 12:07
2  
@Davide: Not my downvote, but I'm not really sure why you posted an answer that "was not supposed to be the full answer". That's what comments are for. –  Cody Gray Feb 3 '11 at 12:16

You've a good option to solve that.

You can implement an enumeration of label kinds and an attribute.

public enum StickerKinds
{
     NewRoll, Enumerated, Quality
}

public class StickedAttribute : Attribute
{
      public StickedAttribute(StickerKinds kind)
      {
           _kind = kind;
      }

      private readonly StickerKinds _kind;

      public StickerKinds Kind 
      {
           get { return _kind; }
      }
}

Now you can have a class called "StickerLabeler" which implements a method called "NextLabel" accepting an input parameter of type StickerKinds and returns a string, representing the whole label as text.

And, finally, an extension method to easly retrieve attributes:

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
    public static TAttribute GetAttribute<TAttribute>(this object source)
        where TAttribute : Attribute
    {
        if (source != null)
        {
            object[] attributeSearchResult = source.GetType().GetCustomAttributes(typeof(TAttribute), true);

            if (attributeSearchResult.Length > 0)
            {
                return (TAttribute)attributeSearchResult.Single();
            }
            else
            {
                return default(TAttribute);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return default(TAttribute);
        }
    }
}

Your code will look like this:

public void AddSticker(StickerBase sticker)
{
    sticker.Label = StickerLabeler.NextLabel(sticker.GetAttribute<StickedAttribute>().Kind);

    // TODO: Implement code to add the sticker to the store.
}

EDIT: I forgot to mention that you'll be using the StickedAttribute in your subclasses of StickerBase:

[Sticked(StickerKinds.NewRoll)]
public class StickerNewRoll
{ 
...
}

UPDATE: Well, in fact, there's no reason to subclass anymore. You can have an Sticker class and that attribute will decide the kind of the sticker.

UPDATE 2: You can do another enhancement. Implement a read-only property in the Sticker class "Kind" which may read the attribute and it'll return the StickerKinds enumeration value of the so-called attribute, so, now your code can be even cleaner:

public void AddSticker(StickerBase sticker)
{
    sticker.Label = StickerLabeler.NextLabel(sticker.Kind);

    // TODO: Implement code to add the sticker to the store.
}

UPDATE 3: Andreas - a commenter of my answer - made me think that you may need subclassing, because each kind of sticker would have its own properties and the so-called attribute would be applied to these derived classes.

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Again, incredible how people down-votes an answer without commenting what's wrong. This approach let's you create new sticker labels without the need of a StickerBase-derived class, which may be useful for him for other purposes –  Matías Fidemraizer Feb 3 '11 at 11:39
    
Why involve attributes? By using polymorphism, he could just have different implementations of NextLabel instead of depending on an enum. Your solution will only lead to replacing the conditional on type with a switch case, which is only slightly better. –  Andreas Vendel Feb 3 '11 at 11:39
    
@Andreas, you're right, but the type of "label" is more a kind than a "class". It's a concept and instead of creating an abstract method and letting derived class implement the "next label" mechanism, you give this responsibility to a "labeler". It's like saying hey product, label you yourself! Do you find this a good design? Good design isn't using design patterns without thinking before :D –  Matías Fidemraizer Feb 3 '11 at 11:44
    
@Andreas, ah, and with my approach, you leave your objects as POCO, instead of implementing the business in the domain object, the business is implemented in a "labeler" (maybe a manager). Again, maybe it's not the most common approach, but I believe that I'll need good reasons to think I'm wrong (I'm open to hear them, I like auto criticism and be criticised, but show me the reasons). –  Matías Fidemraizer Feb 3 '11 at 11:47
    
In this case there seems to be a bit of logic involved when deciding how to create labels, and the logic is dependent on what type of sticker this is. This is why putting the logic in the Sticker sub-class seems like a good idea. And a lot simpler than dealing with attributes, also. Even when going with a sticker kind enum and logic in the base class, I would rather put it as an abstract property in the StickerBase class than as an attribute. But I don't see the point with the enum. –  Andreas Vendel Feb 3 '11 at 11:51

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