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I'm writing a javascript that is supposed to attach a context menu to an element in the document. The jquery plugin for the context menu requires an id of the context menu and an options object. The options objects has a property called bindings that should have key/value pairs where the key is an id of a menu item and the value is a function invoked upon click.

The problem is that the bindings object that I'm trying to populate doesn't attach functions as values when using bracket notion, and I need it since, the menu items' id's cannot be determined in advance.

    var bindings = {};

    var bindingsFunction = function(t){
        alert('Trigger was ' + t.id + '\nAction was Open');
    };

    var $listItems = $contextMenu.find('li');

    $listItems.each(function(index, item){
        var key = '' + item.id;
        bindings[key] = bindingsFunction;
    });

    console.log('bindings is empty', bindings); 

    var result = $icon.contextMenu(contextMenuId, {
        bindings: bindings
    });
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3 Answers 3

You didn't include the HTML that your script is working on, but my guess is that the li elements that are being selected do not have an id property. As a result, when you assign item.id to key, it's an empty string and thus not a valid property name.

If you tack an id on each li, it should work just fine: http://jsfiddle.net/8TL7u/

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yes, the console.log i removed from the script did show the id's and also bindings[id] = id worked. –  Azder Feb 3 '11 at 11:56
    
An empty string is a perfectly valid property name, it just can't be accessed with dot notation. –  Matthew Crumley Feb 3 '11 at 13:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It was working in Chrome, so I remembered that I'm working on a Firefox 4 Beta, so I just restarted Firefox and it magically worked. If I could reproduce it again I would be able to provide more details.

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That might be just a "buggy"(?) display from Firebug. Example:

var mytest = {};

var foo = function() {
};

mytest['foo'] = foo;

console.log(mytest);

will display:

Object { }

Looks like an empty object, but if you click on it you'll see the content.

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I did click, but it didn't show, the funny thing is, I restarted Firefox and it magically worked. Only if I could reproduce it again. –  Azder Feb 3 '11 at 11:54
    
@Azder: interesting, I have this behavior pretty often. –  jAndy Feb 3 '11 at 11:55

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