Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a strange 'destructor' Behavior in C++

Here is the code I call :

_log->OnCommit();
delete _log;

The problem is that when I call "delete _log;" it crash because the variable 'Entries' is invalid !!!!

Do you know why ?

Here is my class code :

struct TransactionLogEntry {
    DependencyObject* Object;
    bool IsAttached;
    bool IsDeleted;
    bool IsUpdated;
};

class TransactionLog
{
public:
    TransactionLog();
    ~TransactionLog();

    void OnCommit();

    map<DependencyObject*, TransactionLogEntry*> Entries;
};

void TransactionLog::OnCommit()
{
    map<DependencyObject*, TransactionLogEntry*>::iterator it;

    for(it = Entries.begin(); it != Entries.end(); it++)
    {
        TransactionLogEntry* entry = (TransactionLogEntry*)(*it).second;
        if (entry->IsDeleted)
            delete entry->Object;

        delete entry;
    }

    Entries.clear();
}

TransactionLog::~TransactionLog()
{
    map<DependencyObject*, TransactionLogEntry*>::iterator it;

    for(it = Entries.begin(); it != Entries.end(); it++)
    {
        TransactionLogEntry* entry = (TransactionLogEntry*)(*it).second;
        delete entry;
    }

    Entries.clear();
}
share|improve this question
2  
Why are you casting it->second? –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 13:04
    
Does onCommit returns correctly? have you checked it under a debugger? –  Naveen Feb 3 '11 at 13:04
2  
TransactionLogEntry's dtor should probably be handling delete entry->Object. –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 13:05
2  
post a complete, compilable but short example of the problem. The bug might be somewhere else in code you didn't show. Tips: Get rid of the C-style casts. We have a shortcut for (*it).second and it's called it->second. –  sellibitze Feb 3 '11 at 13:07
2  
Start off by isolating your problem code. I.e. simplify by taking out what you have there and also TransactionLogEntry and run that in separation. Reproduce the problem. Now you have less moving part to look at. If you already have unit tests, this is the place to start. –  murrekatt Feb 3 '11 at 13:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you storing naked pointers in the Entries map? If so, you should investigate using boost::shared_ptr (or tr1::shared_ptr if youve got that) instead. This greatly simplifies storage management (for example you can delete the for loop in TransactionLog::OnCommit(), and just call Entries.clear().

share|improve this answer

It's hard to see without complete code, however I can notice that you're violating the rule of the big three (you have a destructor, but no copy constructor or assignment operator) and this means looking for troubles.

My wild guess is that you're copy-constructing log or other similar problems and once you enter in UB mode then anything can happen, including raising errors in places that should be ok.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice catch. I know to look for this and I still didn't catch it before seeing your answer. Automatically generated copy ctors and assignment op are a bane. :( –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 13:07
    
Thanks, Yes I do 'delete entry' but later I 'clear' the map, so why should I do something like this ? delete entry; Entries[it->first] = 0; I have add this line and it still crash :-( Thanks –  Spectral Feb 3 '11 at 13:20
    
@user346113: Because any copies of the TransactionLog object would copy the map and thus copy the pointers. Then you clear one map after deleting the pointer, but not any copies of that map. This leads to UB when you later access entries pointed to by the copied map. –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 13:29
    
Also, TransactionLog are only used as pointer. I think that there is no "copy" constructor related problem ! At least... I think ! –  Spectral Feb 3 '11 at 13:32
2  
user346113: If you don't think there is a problem. Make the copy constructor and assignment operator private (and undefined) and see if it compiles. If it does then you should be OK it it fails to compile then you have a problem. –  Loki Astari Feb 3 '11 at 18:19

As said, you're missing a copy ctor and assignment operator for TransactionLog. Here is the problem, simplified:

struct A {
  int *p;
  A() : p (new int()) {}
  ~A() { delete p; }
}

This properly allocates and destroys an object, right? Not quite:

void example() {
  A a;
  A b = a;  // Missing copy ctor; could also happen when passing/returning by value.
  b = a;  // Same result through missing assignment operator.
  assert(a.p == b.p);  // Here is the problem!
  // When b is destroyed, it deletes the pointer.
  // When a is destroyed, it attempts to delete the deallocated pointer,
  // leading to undefined behavior.
}

And here is the same problem written more closely to your code:

struct A {
  map<string, int*> m;
  A() {
    m["abc"] = new int();
  }
  ~A() {
    for (map<string, int*>::iterator x = m.begin(); x != m.end(); ++x) {
      delete x->second;
    }
  }
  void on_commit() {
    for (map<string, int*>::iterator x = m.begin(); x != m.end(); ++x) {
      delete x->second;
    }
    m.clear();
  }
}

The solution is to declare a copy ctor and assignment operator for your class. Even if your class is "non-copyable", you should still declare them, but make them private and don't define them:

struct A {
  int *p;
  A() : p (new int()) {}
  ~A() { delete p; }

private:
  A(A const&);
  A& operator=(A const&);
}

When they are private, any use (in an inaccessible context) will be a compiler error.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Fred, I have understand the explanation... but there is NO copy anywhere ! I just do log->commit(); delete log; The commit works fine. But after the 'Entries' is invalid. Also 'log' is always a pointer, it is not like in your example where a,b are values ! So, when in 'commit' I remove 'Entries.clear' and 'delete entry' I have no crash ! So, there is a problem with theses lines ! –  Spectral Feb 3 '11 at 13:43
    
@user346113: Then you need to give us a complete and reproducible test case. This answer and the other point out a very significant problem in your code; you should still make the copy ctor and op= private if you don't want to use them. –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 13:45
    
Of course, it is good idea that you have. I have try it (In case I have forgot something). But none is called and the problem is still there ! It just prove that the problem is somewhere else ! –  Spectral Feb 3 '11 at 13:55
    
@user346113: That's why we need a complete and reproducible test case. –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 14:04

Looking at what you have in the OnCommit function:

...
if (entry->IsDeleted)
    delete entry->Object;

delete entry;
...

it looks like you check if something is deleted. If so, you delete something inside it and always delete the object again. Looks like you're asking for problems.

share|improve this answer

here may 2 cents:

  1. as it was said before, try to avoid using naked c/c++ pointers to objects, instead use some kind of smart ptr (e.g. boost::shared_ptr) or auto_ptr for simple holding/releasing resources (but not in stl containers due to auto_ptr specific)

  2. about this crash: there is nothing to prevent you from filling map object with different keys but the same values. so it becomes possible to delete object twice or more times which definitely leads to crash (you can delete pointer twice or more if it is equal to 0). so write this:

    delete ptr; ptr = 0;

instead of just deleting a pointer

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.