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I have a small piece of code here for your consideration which puzzles me quite a lot. The strange thing is that it compiles on both Sun Studio and GCC even though I think it should not.

Consider this:

namespace name
{
  class C
    {
      int a;
    };

  void f(C c);
  void g(int a);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  name::C c;

  name::f(c); 
  f(c);  // <--- this compiles, strangely enough

  name::g(42);
  // g(42);  <--- this does not, as I expected
}

The class argument from the same namespace causes the function f to 'leak' out of the namespace and be accessible without name::.

Does anybody have an explanation for this? It is certainly me and not the compiler being wrong here.

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Interesting, BTW intel compiler (icpc) compiles this as well... –  Artyom Feb 3 '11 at 13:13
    
Edited my own question in order to remove the irrelevant bits and make it easier to find for others with the same problem. –  lytenyn Feb 3 '11 at 13:43
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4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

It's called argument-dependent lookup (or Koenig lookup). In short, the compiler will look for the function in namespaces that are the namespaces of argument types.

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1  
Thank you, this is a C++ feature I had never heard about.. –  lytenyn Feb 3 '11 at 13:33
5  
@lytenyn: it's one you use everyday though :) std::string s; s += "aa";, here += comes from the std namespace even though you never specified it, thanks to ADL. –  Matthieu M. Feb 3 '11 at 14:14
    
@matthieu-m: you are perfectly right, of course, same thing when using iostreams. But these are the small things you never think about unless someone pushes your nose into it :) Also, I cannot recall any C++ book I read ever mentioning it, even though it is so fundamental. This might just be my memory, of course. –  lytenyn Feb 3 '11 at 14:18
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This is Argument-Dependent Name Lookup, a.k.a. ADL, a.k.a. Koenig lookup. This was invented to make operators work as expected, e.g.:

namespace fu {
    struct bar { int i; };
    inline std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& o, const bar& b ) {
        return o << "fu::bar " << b.i;
    }
}

fu::bar b;
b.i = 42;
std::cout << b << std::endl; // works via ADL magic

Without ADL you'd have to either explicitly bring the output operator with ugly using fu::operator<<;, or use even uglier explicit call:

fu::operator<<( std::cout, b ) << std::endl;
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1  
+1 for the link, wish you had summarized the article though. –  Christopher Pfohl Feb 3 '11 at 13:20
2  
The article is very short, where's your curiosity? –  Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 3 '11 at 13:50
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It's due to "argument dependent lookup". Removing the const will not change the behavior you're seeing. To demonstrate that it's ADL, try moving the St struct outside of the namespace...

struct St
{
   int a;
};

namespace name
{
  void f(const St& st);
  void g(int a);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  St st;

  name::f(st); 
  f(st);  // <--- now you will get the expected compile error

  name::g(42);
  // g(42);  <--- this does not, as I expected
}
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That is caused by argument dependent lookup.

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