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template<int size>
inline void* byteswap(void* __x);

template<>
inline void* byteswap<2>(void* __x)
{
    return (*(uint16*)__x >> 8) | (*(uint16*)__x << 8);
}

template<>
inline void* byteswap<4>(void* __x)
{
    return (byteswap<4>(__x & 0xffff) << 16) | (bswap_16 (__x >> 16));
}

template<typename T>
inline T byteswap(T& swapIt)
{
    return (T*)byteswap<sizeof(T)>(swapIt);
}    

int main() {
    uint32 i32 = 0x01020304;
    uint16 i16 = 0x0102;

    byteswap(i32);
    byteswap(i16);

    return 0;
}

The above obviously doesn't even compile. I'm confused as it seems that I need void* as parameter for the function and things kinda get ugly in byteswap<4> when I need to call byteswap<2> but with a reference.

Any idea how to make this look pretty? Is it possible for it to achieve (using inlining or other tricks) to make it as performance as doing the bit-operations directly?

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1  
don't use two leading underscore, they are reserved! – Simone Feb 3 '11 at 14:35
    
Dude, Fred, you're everywhere! – chriskirk Feb 3 '11 at 14:46
    
Hah; I hadn't realized this was the third time in two days that I commented on one of your questions then moved it to an answer. :) – Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 15:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is how I'd code it:

#include <iostream>

typedef unsigned short uint16;
typedef unsigned int uint32;

template<typename T> T byteswap(T value);

template<>
uint16 byteswap<uint16>(uint16 value)
{
    return (value >> 8)|(value << 8);
}

template<>
uint32 byteswap<uint32>(uint32 value)
{
    return uint32(byteswap<uint16>(value) << 16) | byteswap<uint16>(value >> 16);
}

int main() {
    uint32 i32 = 0x11223344;
    uint16 i16 = 0x2142;

    std::cout << std::hex << byteswap(i32) << std::endl; // prints 44332211
    std::cout << std::hex << byteswap(i16) << std::endl; // prints 4221
}

in other words, I wouldn't use size as template parameter as you were doing.

EDIT
sorry, my first code was plain wrong wrt/ uint32 swapping.

share|improve this answer

Borrowing from some code:

template<int N>
void byteswap_array(char (&bytes)[N]) {
  // Optimize this with a platform-specific API as desired.
  for (char *p = bytes, *end = bytes + N - 1; p < end; ++p, --end) {
    char tmp = *p;
    *p = *end;
    *end = tmp;
  }
}

template<typename T>
T byteswap(T value) {
  byteswap_array(*reinterpret_cast<char (*)[sizeof(value)]>(&value));
  return value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Fred, while elegant and flexible, I think that the @Simone's solution is more straightforward and I imagine a bit more performant than setting up a loop. What do you think? I'm only in need of 16 and 32-bit byteswapping routines. – chriskirk Feb 3 '11 at 14:58
1  
@chriskirk: If you only need 16- and 32-bit, you can simply use htons and htonl on a little-endian machine – or copy their implementation for use on big-endian. The loop iterations are constant since they depend on the compile-time constant N and I would expect an optimizing compiler to unroll it. Beware of a priori assumptions. In the worst case, you can provide explicit instantiations of byteswap_array that manually unroll the loop. – Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 15:02
    
@chriskirk: If you only need 16bit and 32bit, why even bother with all this and not just write an overload? – Puppy Feb 3 '11 at 16:23

I'll rewrite it like that:

template < size_t size >
inline void sized_byteswap(char* data);

template <>
inline void sized_byteswap< 2 >(char* data)
{
    uint16_t* ptr = reinterpret_cast<uint16_t*>(data);
    *ptr = (*ptr >> 8)|(*ptr << 8);
}

template <>
inline void sized_byteswap< 4 >(char* data)
{
    uint32_t* ptr = reinterpret_cast<uint32_t*>(data);
    *ptr = (*ptr >> 24)|((*ptr & 0x00ff0000) >> 8)|((*ptr & 0x0000ff00) << 8)|(*ptr << 24);
}

template < typename T >
T byteswap(T value)
{
    sized_byteswap< sizeof(T) >(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&value));
    return value;
}

int main()
{
    uint32 i32 = byteswap(uint32(0x01020304));
    uint16 i16 = byteswap(uint16(0x0102));

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

i think you are conceptually wrong as definitions of byteswap(2) and byteswap(4) . i dont think the way you defined is right plase refer to url http://www.iis.sinica.edu.tw/~kathy/vcstl/templates.htm#T6

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