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Before going to describe my problem first,I would like to define definitions of Decorator and Extension method Decorator

Attach additional responsibilities to an object dynamically. Decorators provide a flexible alternative to subclassing for extending functionality

Extension method

Extension methods enable you to "add" methods to existing types without creating a new derived type, recompiling, or otherwise modifying the original type

I have following code snippet in c#

public interface IMyInterface
{
    void Print();
}

public static class Extension
{
    public static void PrintInt(this IMyInterface myInterface, int i)
    {
        Console.WriteLine
            ("Extension.PrintInt(this IMyInterface myInterface, int i)");
    }

    public static void PrintString(this IMyInterface myInterface, string s)
    {
        Console.WriteLine
            ("Extension.PrintString(this IMyInterface myInterface, string s)");
    }
}

public class Imp : IMyInterface
{
    #region IMyInterface Members

    public void Print()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Imp");
    }

    #endregion
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Imp obj = new Imp();
        obj.Print();
        obj.PrintInt(10);
    }
}

In the above code I am extending interface without modifying the existing code,and these two methods are available to derived class. So my question is this: Is the extension method a replacement of the decorator pattern?

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Maybe decorator pattern would have been found to replace static extension methods mainly because static methods are tough to test and they increase coupling. –  Rockstart Oct 25 '12 at 12:53
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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

A extension method is really just syntactic sugar for calling a static method.

While with a decorator you could actually change the behaviour of your decorated class, a extension method could only alter properties or call methods on your class, just like an "ordinary" static method.

Decorator pattern is actually definied as using a wrapper to alter behaviour, which a extension method clearly doesn't do.

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Thanks dkson –  geek Feb 3 '11 at 15:49
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Ýou miss the dynamic part of the decorator pattern. Extension methods are static beasts defined at compile time and can be used or not... but not modified / exchanged at runtime.

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Thanks jdehaan for comment.you mean that In decorator pattern we add new functionality to type dynamically without knowing it. –  geek Feb 3 '11 at 15:43
1  
Yes this usually involves agreeing on an interface but this functionality shall also be replaceable at runtime which is not the case with extension methods: they are compile time choices. –  jdehaan Feb 3 '11 at 21:04
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Extension methods are not a replacement for the decorator pattern. Extension methods work to provide functionality to an existing type without having to create a derived type.

This is different from the traditional implementation to the decorator pattern. The decorator pattern allows you to dynamically provide multiple behaviors to an object at runtime without having to create a new subclass for each combination of those behaviors.

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Extension method a Decorator pattern or a Visitor pattern? After reading I would say its more akin to the Visitor.

Quoting the greatness that is wikipedia, the pedia that never has errors :P

In object-oriented programming and software engineering, the visitor design pattern is a way of separating an algorithm from an object structure it operates on. A practical result of this separation is the ability to add new operations to existing object structures without modifying those structures. It is one way to easily follow the open/closed principle. In essence, the visitor allows one to add new virtual functions to a family of classes without modifying the classes themselves; instead, one creates a visitor class that implements all of the appropriate specializations of the virtual function. The visitor takes the instance reference as input, and implements the goal through double dispatch.

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