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I am looking for a perl regex that would match "vserver foo2" from the output below. However, I want to return the line of the match, and all the following lines up to the "!" I only want to print the config for "vserver foo2"
Thx for the help!

Cisco config:
!
vserver foo1
description foo
virtual 1.1.1.1 tcp www
serverfarm foofoo
persistent rebalance
inservice
!
vserver foo2
description foo2
virtual 1.1.1.2 tcp www
serverfarm foofoo2
persistent rebalance
inservice
!
vserver foo3
description foo3
virtual 1.1.1.3
serverfarm foo3
replicate csrp connection
persistent rebalance
inservice
!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
perl -ne 'print if /^vserver foo2/ .. /^!/' config.txt
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1  
thats why i love perl. it just gets what you mean :) –  matthias krull Feb 3 '11 at 17:21

Assuming that $content has all the file, then you should do something like:

my ($config) = $content =~ m/\n!\n(vserver foo2[^!]*)/sm;

assuming that you don't have a the '!' somewhere in your configuration.

But a better way to do it, I think, will be to run a loop, and skip the regex: assuming the $fh is the file handle:

my $line;
# cut the leading lines
do {
  $line = <$fh>;
  chomp $line;
while ($line ne "!");

while ($line = <$fh>) {
   chomp $line;
   my $found = ($line eq "vserver foo2");
   while ($line = <$fh>) {
      chomp $line;
      break if $line eq "!";
      say $line if $found; 
   }
   break if $found;
}
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open IN, '<', '1.txt';
while(<IN>) {
    if (/^vserver foo2$/) { $found = 1 }
    last if (/^!$/ and $found);
    print if $found
}
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An regular expression to match the string vserver foo2 is easy: /vserver foo2/.

Perhaps the easiest way to get multiple lines for this problem is to override the input record separator variable $/ when you load this file, so that every record (everything between the "!"'s) is kept in a single scalar. For example,

local $/ = "!\n";
open my $fh, '<', $cisco_config_file;
my @configurations = <$fh>;

Now each element of @configurations contains an entire record. To get the matching records, now you just say

my @matching_records = grep { /vserver foo2/ } @configurations;
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Thank you all for the quick response and great suggestions. –  dars33 Feb 3 '11 at 17:48

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