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What are the elegant and effective ways to count the frequency of each "english" word in a file?

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7  
Define "word." Do you mean "English words" or "uninterrupted sequences of alphabetic characters" or "uninterrupted sequences of characters," or something else? –  James McNellis Feb 3 '11 at 16:41
    
for what purpose - just for fun? –  tenfour Feb 3 '11 at 16:49
    
Again, what does ""english"" mean? Actual English words or sequences matching [A-Za-z]+? What about hyphenated words or otherwise punctuated words? –  James McNellis Feb 3 '11 at 17:04
1  
Do contractions and possessive words count? For example, can't, and The cat's toy.. –  Thomas Matthews Feb 3 '11 at 17:55
1  
Do the letter sequences have to be valid English words? For example, a is a valid word, but t is not. –  Thomas Matthews Feb 3 '11 at 17:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

First of all, I define letter_only std::locale so as to ignore punctuations coming from the stream, and to read only valid "english" letters from the input stream. That way, the stream will treat the words "ways", "ways." and "ways!" as just the same word "ways", because the stream will ignore punctuations like "." and "!".

struct letter_only: std::ctype<char> 
{
    letter_only(): std::ctype<char>(get_table()) {}

    static std::ctype_base::mask const* get_table()
    {
        static std::vector<std::ctype_base::mask> 
            rc(std::ctype<char>::table_size,std::ctype_base::space);

        std::fill(&rc['A'], &rc['z'+1], std::ctype_base::alpha);
        return &rc[0];
    }
};

Solution 1

int main()
{
     std::map<std::string, int> wordCount;
     ifstream input;
     input.imbue(std::locale(std::locale(), new letter_only())); //enable reading only letters!
     input.open("filename.txt");
     std::string word;
     while(input >> word)
     {
         ++wordCount[word];
     }
     for (std::map<std::string, int>::iterator it = wordCount.begin(); it != wordCount.end(); ++it)
     {
           cout << it->first <<" : "<< it->second << endl;
     }
}

Solution 2

struct Counter
{
    std::map<std::string, int> wordCount;
    void operator()(const std::string & item) { ++wordCount[item]; }
    operator std::map<std::string, int>() { return wordCount; }
};

int main()
{
     ifstream input;
     input.imbue(std::locale(std::locale(), new letter_only())); //enable reading only letters!
     input.open("filename.txt");
     istream_iterator<string> start(input);
     istream_iterator<string> end;
     std::map<std::string, int> wordCount = std::for_each(start, end, Counter());
     for (std::map<std::string, int>::iterator it = wordCount.begin(); it != wordCount.end(); ++it)
     {
          cout << it->first <<" : "<< it->second << endl;
     }
 }
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However, the answer made it also clear that "non-whitespace character sequences delimited by whitespace" is not the definition of "word" the OP is after. –  sbi Feb 3 '11 at 16:51
1  
I think this is the right answer since he want the frequency of repeated words. –  Murilo Vasconcelos Feb 3 '11 at 16:52
1  
+1 for right guess :D –  UmmaGumma Feb 3 '11 at 16:54
1  
The input loop in the first solution is wrong. The eof flag is set after an input operation that fails due to reaching eof. –  James McNellis Feb 3 '11 at 16:56
1  
@Nawaz: Why not just use the idiomatic while (input >> word)? It's still wrong as written since the other flags aren't checked. –  James McNellis Feb 3 '11 at 17:23

Pseudocode for an algorithm which I believe to be close to what you want:

counts = defaultdict(int)
for line in file:
  for word in line.split():
    if any(x.isalpha() for x in word):
      counts[word.toupper()] += 1

freq = sorted(((count, word) for word, count in counts.items()), reversed=True)
for count, word in freq:
  print "%d\t%s" % (count, word)

Case-insensitive comparison is handled naïvely and probably combines words you don't want to combine in an absolutely general sense. Be careful of non-ASCII characters in your implementation of the above. False positives may include "1-800-555-TELL", "0xDEADBEEF", and "42 km", depending on what you want. Missed words include "911 emergency services" (I'd probably want that counted as three words).

In short, natural language parsing is hard: you probably can make due with some approximation depending on your actual use case.

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A funny way to answer a C++ question: Providing Python code and then declaring it to be pseudocode. Considering, this uses types from the Python stdlib without importing it, and comprehensions, and that any C++ folks reading this have to guess a lot, I'm surprised this got an upvote. Maybe this is a secret experiment to see how many C++ programmers can be silently & unknowingly converted to Python enthusiasts? –  cfi Jan 10 at 13:14

My solution is the following one. Firstly, all symbols are converted to spaces. Then, basically the same solution provided here before is used in order to extract words:

const std::string Symbols = ",;.:-()\t!¡¿?\"[]{}&<>+-*/=#'";
typedef std::map<std::string, unsigned int> WCCollection;
void countWords(const std::string fileName, WCCollection &wcc)
    {
        std::ifstream input( fileName.c_str() );

        if ( input.is_open() ) {
            std::string line;
            std::string word;

            while( std::getline( input, line ) ) {
                // Substitute punctuation symbols with spaces
                for(std::string::const_iterator it = line.begin(); it != line.end(); ++it) {
                    if ( Symbols.find( *it ) != std::string::npos ) {
                        *it = ' ';
                    }

                }

                // Let std::operator>> separate by spaces
                std::istringstream filter( line );
                while( filter >> word ) {
                    ++( wcc[word] );
                }
            }
        }

    }
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Don't use !eof(). –  Fred Nurk Feb 4 '11 at 1:27
    
I've improved the algorithm and fixed minor bugs. –  Baltasarq Feb 5 '11 at 12:10

One more simple way is to count the number of spaces in the file till more then one space was found, if you consider only single space between words...

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Here is working solution.This should work with real text (including punctuation) :

#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <cctype>

std::string getNextToken(std::istream &in)
{
    char c;
    std::string ans="";
    c=in.get();
    while(!std::isalpha(c) && !in.eof())//cleaning non letter charachters
    {
        c=in.get();
    }
    while(std::isalpha(c))
    {
        ans.push_back(std::tolower(c));
        c=in.get();
    }
    return ans;
}

int main()
{
    std::map<std::string,int> words;
    std::ifstream fin("input.txt");

    std::string s;
    std::string empty ="";
    while((s=getNextToken(fin))!=empty )
            ++words[s];

    for(std::map<std::string,int>::iterator iter = words.begin(); iter!=words.end(); ++iter)
        std::cout<<iter->first<<' '<<iter->second<<std::endl;
}

Edit: Now my code calling tolower for every letter.

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This undoubtedly works for english (which is what the OP asked, It know), but not for other languages. I won't also work if there is a number in the input text. –  Baltasarq Feb 3 '11 at 17:36
    
@Baltasarq question asks "english" words.Also is_alpha doesn't return true for digits. –  UmmaGumma Feb 3 '11 at 17:47
  1. Decide on exactly what you mean by "an English word". The definition should cover things like whether "able-bodied" is one word or two, how to handle apostrophes ("Don't trust 'em!"), whether capitalization is significant, etc.

  2. Create a set of test cases so you can be sure you get all the decisions in step 1 correct.

  3. Create a tokenizer that reads the next word (as defined in step 1) from the input and returns it in a standard form. Depending on how your definition, this might be a simple state machine, a regular expression, or just relying on <istream>'s extraction operators (e.g., std::cin >> word;). Test your tokenizer with all the test cases from step 2.

  4. Choose a data structure for keeping the words and counts. In modern C++, you'd probably end up with something like std::map<std::string, unsigned> or std::unordered_map<std::string, int>.

  5. Write a loop that gets the next word from the tokenizer and increments its count in the histogram until there are no more words in the input.

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