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I have a text file named "file1" containing the following data :

apple  
appLe  
app^e  
app\^e  

Now the commands given are :

1.)grep app[\^lL]e file1  
2.)grep "app[\^lL]e" file1  
3.)grep "app[l\^L]e" file1  
4.)grep app[l\^L]e file1

output in 1st case : app^e

output in 2nd case :   
                     apple  
                     appLe  
                     app^e  

output in 3rd case :  
                     apple  
                     appLe  
                     app^e

output in 4th case :  
                     apple  
                     appLe  
                     app^e  

why so..?
Please help..!

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What exactly is your question? –  gnur Feb 3 '11 at 17:09
    
What are you expecting the output to be? –  Paul Feb 3 '11 at 17:09
    
why the output is different when we give the pattern in double quotes("app[\^lL]e") and when the pattern is not given in double quotes..? –  Akshay Feb 3 '11 at 17:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
 1.)grep app[\^lL]e file1

The escape (\) is removed by the shell before grep sees it so this is equivalent to app[^lL]e. The bit in brackets matches anything not (from the ^, since it's the first character) L or l

 2.)grep "app[\^lL]e" file1

This time, the \ escapes the ^ so it matches ^ or L or l

 3.)grep "app[l\^L]e" file1

^ works to negate the set only if it is the first character, so this matches ^ or L or l

  4.)grep app[l\^L]e file1

The ^ is escaped, but since it's not the first it doesn't make any difference, so it matches ^ or L or l

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thanks for a very nice and clear answer.. just a small doubt.. in the first case you said that "the escape is removed by the shell". what does that exactly mean.. can you please elaborate a bit more. thanks! –  Akshay Feb 3 '11 at 17:22
    
Updated to make it clearer (I hope) –  Paul Feb 3 '11 at 17:43
    
\ is an escaping char for (standards) shells. Some chars have a special semantic, for instance ^ used in a range specification (at first place) is the complementary operator. So if you want the ^ char, not the operator you must escape it : \^. If you want to escape the escaping char itself : \\. Is this more clear ? –  Jean-Baptiste Yunès Jun 26 '13 at 14:18

In the first case grep app[\^lL]e file1, you do not quote the pattern on the command line, the shell takes care of its expansion. So the search pattern, effectively, becomes

app[^lL]e

and means: "app", then any symbol but "l" or "L", then "e". The only line that fits is

app^e

In other cases, ^ is either escaped and matched literally, or, in addition, it is in the middle of of the pattern.

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