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I have a critical section in code which is delimited by two function calls, say Start() and End(). They use a Monitor to block other threads during execution. Now my problem is, if some thread does't call End() for whatever reason, my whole process is in trouble, since every thread is waiting for this Monitor to get released.

Sure I could use TryEnter with timeout so that I won't wait forever, but this won't release the blocked Monitor, so my program will get into this timeout every time from this time on.

Is there a way to release a blocking Monitor from another thread if a given timeout is over?

void Start(){ Monitor.Enter(obj); }

void End(){ Monitor.Exit(obj); }

EDIT: We are calling Excel through com interop and we cannot be sure that the Excel process will always work as expected. Note this is a web application, so failing to deal for that case is deadly. Start() is called the first time, the request is calling an excel function, End() is called on Request end. There is always the possibility that excel process starts to hang.

EDIT2: I now hda the idea to store the owner of ent lock in a variable and on deadlock I could kill this thread. Wouldn't this release the lock?

                        if (Monitor.TryEnter(excelLocker, 10000) == false)
                        {
                            excelOwner.Abort();
                            excelOwner = null;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            excelOwner = Thread.CurrentThread;
                        }
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Why not set something inside your method to simply while(...) until a certain threshold is met and then break out at that moment? –  Aaron McIver Feb 3 '11 at 17:17
2  
Don't try to patch around bugs in the code. Fix the bug. –  Hans Passant Feb 3 '11 at 17:24
    
@Hans Passant: This is not to fix our bugs. We are calling Excel through com interop and we cannot be sure that the Excel process will always work as expected. Note this is a web application, so failing to deal for that case is deadly. –  codymanix Feb 3 '11 at 17:35
    
@Aaron: Do you mean using polling instead of proper locking? –  codymanix Feb 3 '11 at 17:35
    
Essentially breaking this down to typical async behavior; all async operations are the same in that you do not know when it will return. With this build out a timeout mechanism within your application with regard to all async operations, with one approach polling if no return is received in a given threshold. –  Aaron McIver Feb 3 '11 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

The only thread that can release a lock is the thread that owns the lock. So no, you cannot directly "unblock" the monitor from another thread - this is not possible by design. If you were able to do this, other threads would be able to override the semantics of the lock by releasing it when they did not actually own it.

I am curious to know why you do not use a lock block so that Enter and Exit are guaranteed, instead of using a Monitor directly.

Update

After reading your comment I would highly recommend organizing your code so that you can localize your locking, rather than on request start and request end. If you use a lock you can still serialize access to Excel, but you can guarantee that Enter and Exit are called.

FYI a lock is a Monitor under the hood.

    lock(_syncObj)
    {
        //Do stuff
    }

    //Is equivalent to

    Monitor.Enter(_syncObj);
    try
    {
        //Do stuff
    }
    finally
    {
        Monitor.Exit(_syncObj);
    } 

Using a lock you could localize your locking of Excel as follows:

    //Client code
    ExcelUtil.DoStuff("bling")

    //...

    //Util class manages call to Excel and locking.
    public static class ExcelUtil
    {
        private static readonly object SyncObj = new object();

        public static void DoStuff(string someParam)
        {
            //Guaranteed locking and unlocking even if an exception occurs
            lock (SyncObj)
            {
                DoSomeStuffWithExcelFuncA();
                DoSomeStuffWithExcelFuncB();
            }
        }

        private static void DoSomeStuffWithExcelFuncA()
        {
            //...
        }

        private static void DoSomeStuffWithExcelFuncB()
        {
            //...
        }
    }

As an aside, why are you locking access to Excel? I am guessing that you are using Excel automation server-side for your ASP.Net application. Unless things have moved on significantly this was always very troublesome at least back a few years. If you take out a lock and Excel hangs, you are stuffed. There are 3rd party solutions that can be used instead of Excel automation. Perhaps newer versions of Excel like being used in this way?

Your pattern appears to serialize all requests so that only a single (Excel based) request can be executed at any one time - that doesn't seem to be very desirable.

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This is a ASP app. Start() is called the first time the request is calling an excel function, End() is called on Request end. Is there another way to lock? Is what I want possible with a Mutex or AutoResetEvent? See my Edits. –  codymanix Feb 3 '11 at 17:38

Maybe, but you'd just be hiding the real problem.

What you really need to figure out is WHY your lock isn't being released. If this is C++, you should probably be using a guard (so that locks get released even if something throws).

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>> if some thread does't call End() for whatever reason, my whole process is in trouble, since every thread is waiting for this Monitor to get released.

Lets be precise, I see 2 reasons why some thread doesn't call End():

  • This thread is still executing and it's OK situation unless you are trying to use resource which in unavailable at the moment and keep trying. Therefore if you try to stop this thread manually (from another thread like you said) then you are in danger that your data will be in inconsistent state - just like calling Thread.Abort().

  • The normal flow of the execution is broken by exception. Therefore you need to clean resources and release this monitor in a simple try/finally block.

Update

If it's Excel is unavailable under high load it tends to throw exceptions to notify about it. This topic was discussed recently at Code Review. StackExchange and how to deal with such situations.

Another strategy to deal with situations when you are unsure how long you will wait on the lock is to use Monitor.TryEnter(object, ref bool). It was specially designed for situations when you don't want to wait on the monitor for some time but take some other actions instead - therefore you will not block at all.

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The first reason is the case. we are calling excel on server and fear that it may start to block on heavy load. –  codymanix Feb 3 '11 at 17:44

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