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I have a vector of Student which has a field name.

I want to iterate over the vector.

void print(const vector<Student>& students)
    {
    vector<Student>::iterator it;
    for(it = students.begin(); it < students.end(); it++)
        {
            cout << it->name << endl;
        }
    }

This is apparently illegal in C++.

Please help.

share|improve this question
    
Please read about prefix versus postfix increment operator. it++ should be ++it, and it++ is needed in rare cases (i.e. when erasing while iterating). –  user405725 Feb 3 '11 at 19:10
    
Its fairly obvious what the issue is in this case. However, in the future you should include in your question the exact error message the compiler is giving you. –  T.E.D. Feb 3 '11 at 19:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You have two (three in C++11) options: const_iterators and indexes (+ "range-for" in C++11)

void func(const std::vector<type>& vec) {
  std::vector<type>::const_iterator iter;
  for (iter = vec.begin(); iter != vec.end(); ++iter)
    // do something with *iter

  /* or
  for (size_t index = 0; index != vec.size(); ++index)
    // do something with vec[index]

  // as of C++11
  for (const auto& item: vec)
    // do something with item
  */
}

You should prefer using != instead of < with iterators - the latter does not work with all iterators, the former will. With the former you can even make the code more generic (so that you could even change the container type without touching the loop)

template<typename Container>
void func(const Container& container) {
  typename Container::const_iterator iter;
  for (iter = container.begin(); iter != container.end(); ++iter)
    // work with *iter
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am new to iterators. Can you please tell me which iterators do not like != and why? –  unj2 Feb 4 '11 at 0:11
    
@kunjaan: Only random access iterators support ordering (<), others do not. For example, std::list has bi-directional iterators, that can only be compared for equality. –  eq- Feb 4 '11 at 16:29

Use const_iterator instead. An iterator allows modification of the vector, so you can't get one from a const container.

Also, the idiomatic way to write this loop uses it != students.end() instead of < (though this should work on a vector).

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1  
...but if you ever decide to change to use a list or something similar instead, your code won't work. So use the != form. –  T.E.D. Feb 3 '11 at 19:11
void print(const vector<Student>& students)
    {
    vector<Student>::const_iterator it; // const_iterator
    for(it = students.begin(); it != students.end(); it++)
        {
            cout << it->name << endl;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
void print(const vector<Student>& students)
    {
    for(auto it = students.begin(); it != students.end(); ++it)
        {
            cout << it->name << endl;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
this question is not tagged C++0x –  smerlin Feb 3 '11 at 19:10
1  
But this is nice to remember us about that feature, maybe encouraging us to switch to C++11. +1 –  Offirmo Sep 2 '12 at 13:34

Instead of vector<Student>::iterator, use vector<Student>::const_iterator.

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