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When I try the following

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my @bl = qw(red green blue);
my @a = qw(green yellow purple blue pink);

print Dumper [grep {not @bl} @a];

I get an empty array. I would have expected that @bl was subtracted from @a, so the output was yellow purple pink.

What's wrong here?

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2  
“subtract” is not the right word here. When you do find the right word, you’ll discover it to be one that triggers a Pavlovian hash attack. –  tchrist Feb 4 '11 at 1:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You need to turn @bl into a hash to perform the set difference:

my %in_bl = map {$_ => 1} @bl;
my @diff  = grep {not $in_bl{$_}} @a;
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7  
This is better than the faq answer for this question -- the faq only shows you how to compute the "symmetric difference" between two arrays –  mob Feb 3 '11 at 21:35
1  
@mob: So mail brian with a suggested update. –  tchrist Feb 4 '11 at 1:16
6  
In Perl 5.10 or newer you could write it my @diff = grep{ not $_ ~~ @bl } @a; –  Brad Gilbert Mar 28 '11 at 14:46

See perlfaq4: How do I compute the difference of two arrays?

In your code, not is probably not doing what you think it is doing.

not @bl will always be 1 if @bl is an empty array, and undef if @bl is not empty. It doesn't mean "elements not in @bl" in any sense.

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@b1 evaluates to true (it's an array with a non-zero number of elements), so the boolean test in your grep construct (not @b1) will always return false. grep filters an array returning only the elements for which the boolean test returns true.

You need to test to see whether $_ (the array element currently under consideration) is in @bl or not. One way to do this is to generate a temporary hash using @bl as the keys, then in your grep statement check for the presence of $_ in the hash keys:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my @bl = qw(red green blue);
my @a = qw(green yellow purple blue pink);

# create a hash
my %h;

# nifty trick - use a hash slice to populate the
# hash. The values are irrelevant so we'll use @bl
# for those too
@h{@bl} = @bl;

print Dumper [grep {!exists $h{$_}} @a];
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1  
Populating the values of %h is overkill. If you use exists, populating with @h{@bl}=() will be just fine and probably faster. –  Stefan Majewsky Sep 11 '12 at 8:51

Another way with the Smartmatch-operator ( if you have perl-version 5.010 or greater ):

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use 5.012;

my @bl = qw(red green blue);
my @a = qw(green yellow purple blue pink);

my @s = grep{ not $_ ~~ @bl } @a;
say "@s"; # yellow purple pink
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Another option using perl5i:

use perl5i::2;

my @bl = qw(red green blue);
my @a = qw(green yellow purple blue pink);
my @diff = @a->diff(\@bl);

say @diff->mo->perl;
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Another way, using the minus function from the Acme::Tools CPAN module:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
use Acme::Tools qw(minus);

my @bl = qw(red green blue);
my @a  = qw(green yellow purple blue pink);
my @diff = minus(\@a, \@bl);
print Dumper(\@diff);

__END__

$VAR1 = [
          'yellow',
          'purple',
          'pink'
        ];
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