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In another question I asked for "the best" language for a certain purpose. Realizing this goal was a bit too much to start, I simplified my idea :) But there were really useful language hints. So I decided on Scala for the desktop-app and consider between Perl and Python on the webserver.

I want to program something like an asynchronous chat (little bit like an email). So you start your program pick your name and add a friend with his unique id. Then you can write him a simple message and when your friends start up his pc, launches the "chat.exe" he receives the mail (internet is required) and is able to answer. No special functions, smiley's or text formatting, just simple for learning purpose.

My concept is: Use Scala for the "chat.exe" (Or is just a "chat.jar" possible?) which communicates via SOCKET with a Perl/Python Framework which handles the requests. So you type "Hello there" and click on send. This message is transfered via SOCKET to a Perl/Python script which reads the request an put this message in a MySQL database. On the otherside the chat.exe of your friend checks for new messages and if there is one, the Perl/Python script transfer the message. Also via SOCKET.

Do you think this works out? Is SOCKET appropriate and fits in? Or perhaps REST? But I think for REST-Requests you have to use the URI (http://example.com/newmessage/user2/user3/Hi_how_are_you). This looks very unsecure.

Look forward to your comments!

Have a nice day,

Kurt

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You would not need to use the URI for the content of a REST request, for example you could POST {"sender":"user2","recipient":"user3","message":"Hi how are you"} to example.com/newmessage –  Andrew Clark Feb 3 '11 at 21:35
    
I think you might have more success if you flipped your language choices around: Scala for the server and Python for the desktop app. That being said, you could easily use Scala (or any decent language) for both. But, frankly, your question is rather nebulous and hard to give any sort of authoritative answer. –  pr1001 Feb 3 '11 at 21:37
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Why use three languages and a low-level communication channel? –  Raphael Feb 3 '11 at 21:59
    
"internet is required"? What does this mean? Why is it in here? –  S.Lott Feb 3 '11 at 22:12
    
@Andrew: thanks i look at this in detail! @pr1001: Ok, thanks. But I am not sure if I can compile a standalone python programm (py2exe and pyinstaller look very immature) @Raphel: What would you recommend, I thankful for improvements! @S.Lott Because otherwise the Desktop app could not receive the message from the server –  Kurt Feb 3 '11 at 22:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you ask me, I think Scala is most suitable for the server side. Scala runs on the JVM and Java has a really big ecosystem at the server side. You have a big variety of application servers for every taste (tomcat, jetty, glassfish, etc.).

Chat is a classical use case for actors. I think Akka can inspire you in this area.

You can use wonderful Scala web frameworks like Lift. You can even make a web-based chat. Here is an example of a chat application that uses comet (server push):

http://demo.liftweb.net/chat

About REST: If you feel that it's not secure, then

  1. Use HTTPS to communicate with server
  2. In your example, your intent is to put the message to the server (at least that is how I understood it), so most probably you want to use PUT requests, and in this case the message text would be in the POST request body.
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I thought on using Scala on the server as well. Unfortunately my webhosting plan only supports Perl/Python/PHP (a lot of P's!) but I should consinder to upgrade. Or do you know good alternatives? So with Actors I can communicate between Client/Server? Because I want a desktop program and not "only" a webpage. Thanks! –  Kurt Feb 3 '11 at 22:17
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@Kurt: Yes, you can use use remote actors: doc.akka.io/remote-actors-scala. About hosting... you can use code.google.com/appengine for free (but if you need more processing power, you should pay) and as far as i know Scala works there. You can also look at AWS: aws.amazon.com/ec2 –  tenshi Feb 3 '11 at 22:35

Use Scala for the "chat.exe" (Or is just a "chat.jar" possible?)

Step 1. Figure that out. Actually write some stuff and see what you can build.

which communicates via SOCKET with a Perl/Python Framework which handles the requests.

Not meaningful. All internet communication is done with sockets. Leave this sentence out and you don't lose any meaning.

This message is transfered via SOCKET to a Perl/Python script which reads the request an put this message in a MySQL database.

A little useful information. Sockets, however, go without saying.

On the otherside the chat.exe of your friend checks for new messages and if there is one, the Perl/Python script transfer the message. Also via SOCKET.

Right. Sockets, again, don't mean much.

On top of sockets there are dozens of protocols. FTP, Telnet, HTTP, SMTP, etc., etc.

Step 2 is to figure out which protocol you want to use. REST, by the way is a particular use of HTTP. You should really, really look very closely at HTTP and REST before dismissing them.

This looks very unsecure

Not clear why you're saying this. I can only guess that you don't know about HTTP security features.


A lazy programmer might do this.

  1. Install Python, Django, MySQL-Python and Piston.

  2. Define a Django Model, configure the defaults so that model is exposed as a secure RESTful set of services.

That's sort of it for the server side message GET, POST, PUT and DELETE are all provided by Django, Piston and the Django ORM layer. Authentication can be any of a variety of mechanisms. I'm a big fan of HTTP Digest authentication.

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To implement something like that you would need to go through a MQ System like perhaps ActiveMQ instead of using plain sockets.

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Thanks, Do you have a good introduction to these MQ (same as message brocker?) systems? Kurt –  Kurt Feb 3 '11 at 22:23

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