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I am playing with Linq to learn about it but I can't figure out how to Distinct when I do not have a simple list (a simple list of integer is pretty easy to do, this is not the question). What if want to distinct a list of Object on ONE or MORE Properties of the object?

Example: If an object is "Person", with Property "Id". How can I get all Person and distinct them by the property Id of the object?

Person1: Id=1, Name="Test1"
Person2: Id=1, Name="Test1"
Person3: Id=2, Name="Test2"

How can I get just Person1 and Person3? Is that possible?

If it's not possible with Linq, what would be the best way to have a list of "Person" depending of some of its Properties in .Net 3.5?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 299 down vote accepted

EDIT: This is now part of MoreLINQ.

What you need is a "distinct-by" effectively. I don't believe it's part of LINQ as it stands, although it's fairly easy to write:

public static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctBy<TSource, TKey>
    (this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
{
    HashSet<TKey> seenKeys = new HashSet<TKey>();
    foreach (TSource element in source)
    {
        if (seenKeys.Add(keySelector(element)))
        {
            yield return element;
        }
    }
}

So to find the distinct values using just the Id property, you could use:

var query = people.DistinctBy(p => p.Id);

And to use multiple properties, you can use anonymous types, which implement equality appropriately:

var query = people.DistinctBy(p => new { p.Id, p.Name });

Untested, but it should work (and it now at least compiles).

It assumes the default comparer for the keys though - if you want to pass in an equality comparer, just pass it on to the HashSet constructor.

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This is a good solution, if you assume that when there are multiple non-distinct values (like in his example) you're aiming to return the first one that you see in the enumeration. –  mquander Jan 28 '09 at 21:20
    
Yes, that's what I was assuming based on the question. If he'd requested Person2 and Person3 it would be harder :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 28 '09 at 21:23
    
I think you did an error... the IF statement should not have the !. You want to yield when the element is added..right? –  Patrick Desjardins Jan 28 '09 at 21:44
4  
Source to DistinctBy: code.google.com/p/morelinq/source/browse/MoreLinq/DistinctBy.cs –  Contango Feb 6 '13 at 19:46
3  
@ashes999: If you're only doing this in a single place, ever, then sure, using GroupBy is simpler. If you need it in more than one place, it's much cleaner (IMO) to encapsulate the intention. –  Jon Skeet Feb 19 '13 at 17:29

What if want to distinct a list of Object on ONE or MORE Properties of the object?

Simple! You want to group them and pick a winner out of the group.

List<Person> distinctPeople = allPeople
  .GroupBy(p => p.PersonId)
  .Select(g => g.First())
  .ToList();

If you want to define groups on multiple properties, here's how:

List<Person> distinctPeople = allPeople
  .GroupBy(p => new {p.PersonId, p.FavoriteColor} )
  .Select(g => g.First())
  .ToList();
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Thx for the example! +1 –  Patrick Desjardins Jan 30 '09 at 16:18
1  
Awesome, that is exactly what I was looking for - Thanks! –  VoodooChild Nov 8 '10 at 17:08
1  
Great answer, this makes it simple +1 –  Nick Nov 9 '11 at 21:17
    
Absolutely brilliant! I needed a way to distinctly select on one column and at the same time retain the information from the other columns and this is it! You rock! +1 –  Fedor Steeman Dec 19 '11 at 10:51
40  
Wow, more votes than @JonSkeet. First time I've seen that happen. Well done, sir! –  retrodrone Jun 19 '12 at 14:48

You could also use the syntax if you want it to look all linq like:

var uniquePeople = from p in people
                   group p by new {p.ID} //or group by new {p.ID, p.Name, p.Whatever}
                   into mygroup
                   select mygroup.FirstOrDefault();
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this works fine for me :) –  M.Kumaran May 1 '13 at 8:29
4  
If "First()" doesn't work, try "FirstOrDefault()". –  Chad Hedgcock Dec 28 '13 at 19:53

The following code is functionally equivalent to Jon Skeet's answer above.

Tested on .NET 4.5, should work on any earlier version of LINQ.

public static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctBy2<TSource, TKey>(
  this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
{
  HashSet<TKey> seenKeys = new HashSet<TKey>();
  return source.Where(element => seenKeys.Add(keySelector(element)));
}

Incidentially, check out Jon Skeet's latest version of DistinctBy.cs on Google Code.

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+1 - this is a very useful little extension!! thanks –  jim tollan Nov 25 '13 at 13:04
    
This gave me a "sequence has no values error", but Skeet's answer produced the correct result. –  What Would Be Cool Apr 22 at 23:42

how about:

List<Person> pList = new List<Person>();
/* fill list */

var result = pList.Where(p => p.Name != null).GroupBy(p => p.Id).Select(grp => grp.First());

The where helps you filter the entries (could be more complex) and the groupby and select perform the distinct function. Hope this helps

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I realize this is a bit late... but I've written an article that explains how to extend the Distinct function so that you can do as follows:

var people = new List<Person>();

people.Add(new Person(1, "a", "b"));
people.Add(new Person(2, "c", "d"));
people.Add(new Person(1, "a", "b"));

foreach (var person in people.Distinct(p => p.ID))
    // do stuff with unique list here.

Here's the article: Extending LINQ - Specifying a Property in the Distinct Function

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2  
Your article has an error, there should be a <T> after Distinct: public static IEnumerable<T> Distinct(this... Also it does not look like it will work (nicely) on more that one property i.e. a combination of first and last names. –  row1 Mar 17 '10 at 10:01
1  
+1, a minor error is not a reason enough for downvote, that just so silly, callled a typo often. And I'm yet to see a generic function that will work for any number of property! I hope the downvoter has downvoted every other answer in this thread as well. But hey what is this second type being object?? I object ! –  nawfal Nov 22 '12 at 12:08

I case you need a Distinct method on multiple properties you can check out my PowerfulExtensions library. Currently it's in a very young stage, but already you can use methods like Distinct, Union, Intersect, Except on any number of properties;

This is how you use it:

using PowerfulExtensions.Linq;
...
var distinct = myArray.Distinct(x => x.A, x => x.B);
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You can do it (albeit not lightning-quickly) like so:

people.Where(p => !people.Any(q => (p != q && p.Id == q.Id)));

That is, "select all people where there isn't another different person in the list with the same ID."

Mind you, in your example, that would just select person 3. I'm not sure how to tell which you want, out of the previous two.

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Saved me a lot of time this! Thanks very much. –  DeeMac Dec 18 '13 at 12:30

You should be able to override Equals on person to actually do Equals on Person.id. This ought to result in the behavior you're after.

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The best way to do this that will be compatible with other .NEt versions is to override Equals and GetHash to handle this: linq distinct c sharp

but if you need something that is generic throughout your code, the solutions in this article are great

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When we faced such task in our project we have defined a small API to compose comparators.

So, the use case was like this:

var wordComparer = KeyEqualityComparer.Null<Word>().
  ThenBy(item => item.Text).
  ThenBy(item => item.LangID);
...
source.Select(...).Distinct(wordComparer);

And API itself looks like this:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public static class KeyEqualityComparer
{
  public static IEqualityComparer<T> Null<T>()
  {
    return null;
  }

  public static IEqualityComparer<T> EqualityComparerBy<T, K>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source,
    Func<T, K> keyFunc)
  {
    return new KeyEqualityComparer<T, K>(keyFunc);
  }

  public static KeyEqualityComparer<T, K> ThenBy<T, K>(
    this IEqualityComparer<T> equalityComparer, 
    Func<T, K> keyFunc)
  {
    return new KeyEqualityComparer<T, K>(keyFunc, equalityComparer);
  }
}

public struct KeyEqualityComparer<T, K>: IEqualityComparer<T>
{
  public KeyEqualityComparer(
    Func<T, K> keyFunc, 
    IEqualityComparer<T> equalityComparer = null)
  {
    KeyFunc = keyFunc;
    EqualityComparer = equalityComparer;
  }

  public bool Equals(T x, T y)
  {
    return ((EqualityComparer == null) || EqualityComparer.Equals(x, y)) &&
      EqualityComparer<K>.Default.Equals(KeyFunc(x), KeyFunc(y));
  }

  public int GetHashCode(T obj)
  {
    var hash = EqualityComparer<K>.Default.GetHashCode(KeyFunc(obj));

    if (EqualityComparer != null)
    {
      var hash2 = EqualityComparer.GetHashCode(obj);

      hash ^= (hash2 << 5) + hash2;
    }

    return hash;
  }

  public readonly Func<T, K> KeyFunc;
  public readonly IEqualityComparer<T> EqualityComparer;
}

More details is on our site: IEqualityComparer in LINQ.

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