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I have a vector<data> info where data is defined as:

struct data{
    string word;
    int number;
};

I need to sort info by the length of the word strings. Is there a quick and simple way to do it?

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marked as duplicate by Walter, Sebastian, Kon, SingerOfTheFall, Eric Brown Sep 13 '13 at 6:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
If you think your question was solved, mark one solution as accepted. –  Murilo Vasconcelos Feb 4 '11 at 1:40
    
sorry. i didnt have time to check for the past few hours –  calccrypto Feb 4 '11 at 3:18
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4 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Use a comparison function:

bool compareByLength(const data &a, const data &b)
{
    return a.word.size() < b.word.size();
}

and then use std::sort:

std::sort(info.begin(), info.end(), compareByLength);
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Just make a comparison function/functor:

bool my_cmp(const data& a, const data& b)
{
    // smallest comes first
    return a.word.size() < b.word.size();
}

std::sort(info.begin(), info.end(), my_cmp);

Or provide an bool operator<(const data& a) const in your data class:

struct data {
    string word;
    int number;

    bool operator<(const data& a) const
    {
        return word.size() < a.word.size();
    }
};

or non-member as Fred said:

struct data {
    string word;
    int number;
};

bool operator<(const data& a, const data& b)
{
    return a.word.size() < b.word.size();
}

and just call std::sort():

std::sort(info.begin(), info.end());
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Op< should be a non-member and number should probably be considered in op< so other algorithms, such as std::unique, behave as expected when used with the default std::less; otherwise spot on. –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 23:06
    
Why operator<() should be non-member? –  Murilo Vasconcelos Feb 3 '11 at 23:09
    
@MuriloVasconcelos: So implicit conversions apply to the left-hand side. –  Fred Nurk Feb 3 '11 at 23:16
1  
IMHO, you shouldn't use operator overloading to wrap behaviour that isn't immediately intuitive. In this situation, it doesn't really make any sense to say that data a is "less than" data b if its string member is shorter, so I wouldn't use operator< to express that idea. –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 3 '11 at 23:26
2  
In this case I agree with you and is why I write about the "function-way" first and then I explained the other ways for learning purposes. –  Murilo Vasconcelos Feb 3 '11 at 23:31
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Yes: you can sort using a custom comparison function:

std::sort(info.begin(), info.end(), my_custom_comparison);

my_custom_comparison needs to be a function or a class with an operator() overload (a functor) that takes two data objects and returns a bool indicating whether the first is ordered prior to the second (i.e., first < second). Alternatively, you can overload operator< for your class type data; operator< is the default ordering used by std::sort.

Either way, the comparison function must yield a strict weak ordering of the elements.

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As others have mentioned, you could use a comparison function, but you can also overload the < operator and the default less<T> functor will work as well:

struct data {
    string word;
    int number;
    bool operator < (const data& rhs) const {
        return word.size() < rhs.word.size();
    }
};

Then it's just:

std::sort(info.begin(), info.end());

Edit

As James McNellis pointed out, sort does not actually use the less<T> functor by default. However, the rest of the statement that the less<T> functor will work as well is still correct, which means that if you wanted to put struct datas into a std::map or std::set this would still work, but the other answers which provide a comparison function would need additional code to work with either.

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Interestingly, while std::map and std::set default to using std::less<T>, std::sort and the rest of the sorting functions default to using operator<. You'll only notice a difference if you specialize std::less to do something other than what operator< does. –  James McNellis Feb 3 '11 at 23:00
    
When I said "you'll only notice a difference if...," I was wrong. You'll also notice a difference if you have a container of pointers, e.g. std::vector<int*> v; v.insert(new int); v.insert(new int); std::sort(v.begin(), v.end());, since the behavior is undefined if you compare unrelated pointers using <. That said, why you'd want to sort a container of pointers by the pointer value and not the value of the pointed-to object, I don't know. –  James McNellis Feb 3 '11 at 23:57
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