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Question on iterating through a file and grabbing a specific string based on a precursor requirement.

I am new to bash scripting and have read through the beginner and advanced tutorials on line, but cannot really find anything that address this question.

I have a log file that I am trying to search for a specific word (XXXX in the below example)

If/when the script finds the word it then searches the next couple of lines and outputs the message located between the values "/* */"

Thus the script needs to be able to iterate over the entire log file and grab only the messages between "/* */" but only after seeing XXXX.

Here is an example file that would need to be iterated over. The script should pull out the 2 Error messages.


TRD sdfnWW4
<
   computer_name  11-02-03 17:03:30
T  sdfnWW4 XXXXX
   MFKG
   "::fmksdfjes"
   /* Error message #1 to grab */
asfdadsf
adfadfasd
fasd
sd
-
RAS WEASDF
<
   computer_name  11-02-03 18:03:30
   WEASDF
   "::fmksdfjes"
sdfa
thmghjg
g5w45g5

<
 sdfnWW4
<
   computer_name  11-02-03 17:03:30
T  sdfnWW4 XXXXX
   MFKG
   "::fmksdfjes"
   /* Error message #2 to grab */
adfadfasd
sd

Here is the script I am starting with, simple file reading script, but the code after the XXXX search is where I am stumped.

#!/bin/sh

echo enter file name
read fname

exec<$fname
value=0
while read line
 do
  if [[ $line == *XXXX* ]]
  then
   "this is the part that has me stumped"
  fi
 done

Thanks in advance for any help.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

If you have Ruby(1.9+)

$ ruby -ne 'BEGIN{$/="<"};puts $_.scan(/\/\*(.*?)\*\//)[0][0] if /XXXXX/' file
 Error message #1 to grab
 Error message #2 to grab

if not, awk

$ awk 'BEGIN{RS="<";FS="*/"} /XXXXX/{ gsub(/.*\/\*/,"",$1) ;print $1 }' file
 Error message #1 to grab
 Error message #2 to grab
share|improve this answer

If you have access to grep, grep can filter relevant lines easily. I suggest you read up on this command, but you do

grep XXXX filename -A3

which will output lines from the file named filename which contain the string XXXX and 3 lines after each instance, which is what you want. Then you can just extract the comment text from there by piping the output to another grep to filter out non-comment lines:

grep "/*"

Combined, this is:

grep XXXX filename -A3 | grep "/*"
share|improve this answer
    
Just a warning: The -A flag is an extension that exists in GNU grep, and some BSD greps, but it won't be present on some other flavours of unix. However, since the post is tagged "bash", there's a good chance they're running with a GNU userland, and can use "-A" –  Tim Feb 4 '11 at 2:32
    
Mike, thxs tried grep already with no luck When using, it outputs the grepped value and full 3 lines after, doesn't grep only the error line Test: [user@test parse]$ grep XXXX log2 -A3 | grep "/*" T sdfnWW4 XXXXX MFKG "::fmksdfjes" /* Error message #1 to grab / -- T sdfnWW4 XXXXX MFKG "::fmksdfjes" / Error message #2 to grab */ Can see 1st and 2nd errored lines still there (MFKG, "::fmksdfjes") I didn't state it above, sorry, but the error message might not be in the first 3 lines. Now not an issue if the above worked I could just increase the -Ax value –  Mike Feb 4 '11 at 19:10
    
sorry, was limited in characters, how to enter more? –  Mike Feb 4 '11 at 19:12

You could set a flag when you find your marker, then if the flag is set, increment a counter. If the counter hasn't exceeded a threshold and you find the line you're looking for, print it. Otherwise reset the flag and the counter. You could simply use the counter as the flag.

#!/bin/bash
# UNTESTED - check especially for off-by-one errors

limit=4

read -r -p "enter file name: " fname

exec<$fname
value=0
while read line
do
    if [[ $line == *XXXX* ]]
    then
        counter=1
    fi
    if (( counter > 0 && counter <= limit ))
    then
        if [[ $line == */\**/\** ]]
        then
            printf '%s\n' "$line"
            # setting counter to zero here means only the first instance is printed
            # remove it to print multiple instances following a marker
            counter=0
        fi
        (( counter = (counter + 1) % limit ))
    fi
done

Note that I changed your shebang to Bash since that's how you have your question tagged.

share|improve this answer
    
thxs Dennis will give this a try –  Mike Feb 4 '11 at 19:03

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