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I'm not so strong with arrays but I need to determine how to count the number of parents a child array has in order to determine the indenting to display it as an option in a SELECT.

So, if I have this array:

array(
      'World'=>array(
            'North America'=>array(
                  'Canada'=>array(
                       'City'=>'Toronto'
                   )
            )
      )
);

How would I go about determining how many parents 'City' has in order to translate that into the number of spaces I want to use as an indent?

Thanks for any help.

EDIT: Let's see if I can explain myself better:

I have this code I'm using to build the OPTIONS list for a SELECT:

function toOptions($array) {

    foreach ($array as $key=>$value) {
        $html .= "<option value=\"" . $key . "\" >";

        $html .=  $value['title'];

        $html .= "</option>";

        if (array_key_exists('children', $value)) {
            $html .= toOptions($value['children']);
        }

    }

    return $html;

}

print toOptions($list);

So, I'm trying to determine how to get the number of parents in order to add spaces before the title in this line:

$html .=  $value['title'];

Like:

$html .= "&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;" . $value['title'];

But, I'm not sure how to figure out how many spaces to add.

Hopefully this is more clear.

Thanks for any help so far.

share|improve this question
    
You want to know that number only for City or for all keys in the array? –  Murilo Vasconcelos Feb 4 '11 at 2:25
    
It depends on the scope.. if the current scope is that you just have the array('city' => 'Toronto') within some function, you have no way of finding out, unless you know something else about the array, like certain keys etc.. –  arnorhs Feb 4 '11 at 2:26
    
How did you come to access 'City' without knowing how you got there? –  Dolph Feb 4 '11 at 2:26
    
Are you building a menu? Because if you are, you should be asking what's the best way of building a recursive menu structure in PHP. But that has already been answered –  arnorhs Feb 4 '11 at 2:27
    
What is the code you use to create the select? I'm sure you can easily add white space handling there (at least this would not require another loop over the nested arrays). –  Felix Kling Feb 4 '11 at 2:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
$x = array(
      'World'=>array(
            'North America'=>array(
                  'Canada'=>array(
                       'City'=>'Toronto'
                   )
            )
      )
);

// This function do something with the key you've found in the array
function visit($name, $depth)
{
    echo $name . ' has ' . $depth . ' parents.'; 
}

// This function visits all the contents aff $array
function find_recursive($array, $depth = 0)
{
    if (is_array($array)) {
        foreach ($array as $k => $value) {
            visit($k, $depth + 1);
            find_recursive($array, $depth + 1);
        }
    }
}

For visiting:

find_recursive($x);
share|improve this answer

Well. Off the top what you are dealing with is a multi dimensional array.

You could run a count w/ foreach on each level of the array, and use the count number returned +1 for each level the foreach loops through.

I'm not sure if this answers your question, but I am trying to see exactly what it is you are trying to achieve.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for helping me narrow down what I was having a problem with OldWest. –  AJB Feb 4 '11 at 3:45

As you are already using a recursive function to display that data, you can just extend your function. There is no need to traverse the array more often than one time:

function getWhitespaces($count) {
    $result = '';
    while($count--) {
        $result .= '$nbsp;';
    }
    return $result;
}


function toOptions($array, $level=0) {

    foreach ($array as $key=>$value) {
        $html .= "<option value=\"" . $key . "\" >";

        $html .=  getWhitespaces($level) + $value['title'];

        $html .= "</option>";

        if (array_key_exists('children', $value)) {
            $html .= toOptions($value['children'], $level + 1);
        }

    }

    return $html;

}

print toOptions($list);
share|improve this answer

Try the following.. Your solution screams for recursion in my mind. Its a bit ugly but it seems to work

$totraverse = array(
    'Moon' => array(
        'Dark Side' => "Death Valley"
    ),
    'Halley Commet' => "Solar System",
    'World' => array(
        'North America' => array(
            'Canada' => array(
                'City' => 'Toronto'
            )
        ), 'South America' => array(
            'Argentina' => array(
                'City' => 'Toronto'
            )
        )
    )
);


function traverse($totraverse_, $path="", $count=0) {
    global $array;
    // echo count($totraverse_) . " count\n";
    if (!is_array($totraverse_)) {
        echo "returning $path and  $key\n";
        return array($path, $count);
    } else {
        foreach ($totraverse_ as $key => $val) {

            echo "assting $path and  $key\n";
            $result = traverse($val, $path . "/" . $key, $count + 1);
            if($result){
                $array[]=$result;
            }
        }
    }
    echo false;
}

$array = array();
traverse($totraverse);

foreach($array as $item){
    echo "{$item[0]}--->{$item[1]}\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
You could avoid the global $array in your function buy adding &$array as fourth parameter. –  Felix Kling Feb 5 '11 at 9:27

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