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Do class objects declared on the stack have the same lifetime as other stack variables?

I have this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>
using std::vector;
#include <string>
using std::string;

class Child;
class Parent
{
public:
    Parent(string s) : name(s) { };
    vector<Child> children;
    string name;
};
class Child
{
public:
    Child() { /* I need this for serialization */ };
    Child(Parent *p) : parent(p) { };
    Parent *parent;
};

Parent
family()
{
    Parent p("John Doe");
    int i;
    printf("family:\n\tparent: 0x%x\n\ti: %x\n", &p, &i);
    for (i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
        p.children.push_back(Child(&p));
    return p;
}

int
main(void)
{
    Parent p = family();
    printf("main:\n\tparent: 0x%x\n", &p);
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < p.children.size(); ++i)
        printf
        (
            "\t\tchild[%d]: parent: 0x%x parent.name '%s'\n", 
            i, 
            p.children[i].parent,
            p.children[i].parent->name.c_str()
        ); 
    return 0;
}

My questions:

  • In function family, is Parent p declared on the stack? From looking at the output, it would seem so
  • Each created Child goes on the stack too, right?
  • When I create each Child instance, I pass it a pointer to a stack variable. I imagine this is a big no-no, because stack variables are guaranteed to live only until the end of the function. After that the stack should get popped and the variables will be destroyed. Is this correct?
  • vector.push_back() passes arguments by reference, so at the end of the family function, p.children just contains references to the local variables, right?
  • Why is it all working? In main, why can I access the parent and each of its children? Is it all because the local variables from family are still intact and haven't been overwritten by some subsequent function call?

I think I'm misunderstanding where stuff lives in memory in C++. I'd really like to be pointed a resource that explains it well. Thanks in advance.

EDIT

Output from compiling the source and running:

misha@misha-K42Jr:~/Desktop/stackoverflow$ ./a.out 
family:
    parent: 0x2aa47470
    i: 2aa47438
main:
    parent: 0x2aa47470
        child[0]: parent: 0x2aa47470 parent.name 'John Doe'
        child[1]: parent: 0x2aa47470 parent.name 'John Doe'
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The Child objects that are in the vector survive for the reason that Mark Ransom pointed out, but the pointer to Parent * that each Child contains (which points to p) becomes invalid just as you expected.

If it appears to work, what likely happend is the compiler's optimizer inlined family(), and then combined the storage of main(){p} and family(){p} to avoid copying the returned object. This optimization would be likely even without inlining, but nearly certain with it.

It's easy to see why it would be allowed in this case, since your Parent class doesn't customize the copy constructor, but it's actually allowed regardless. The C++ standard makes special reference to return value optimization, and permits the compiler to pretend that a copy constructor has no side effects, even if it can't prove this.

To fix this, the Parent needs to be allocated on the heap, and some other provision would need to be made to free it. Assuming that no time-travel is involved (so that no object can become its own ancestor), this could be easily accomplished by using tr1::shared_ptr (or boost::shared_pointer for pre-TR1 compilers) for the pointer each child holds to its parent.

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How would you do this properly, in a way that doesn't depend on these optimizations? I thought about putting the parent on the heap. Is there any other option? Would making a Parent copy constructor that updates the child.parent field work? –  misha Feb 4 '11 at 4:27
    
@misha, yes that could work - a copy constructor of Parent could easily copy all of the children and give them a new Parent pointer. –  Mark Ransom Feb 4 '11 at 4:31
    
Yes, since the parent entirely contains its children (since, as Mark said, vector copies them), you could write it so Parent's copy constructor set child.parent = this for each of them. That would guarentee they point to the new copy of parent. If return value optimization eliminates the copying, the original value of parent is still valid, so this makes it work either way. –  puetzk Feb 4 '11 at 4:32
    
Is there any way to prevent this sort of optimization taking place? I'm using -fno-default-inline -fno-inline -O0. I've put the copy constructor in, but it's not being called (checked with gdb). –  misha Feb 4 '11 at 8:53
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It all works because vector makes copies of everything that you push_back. Your family function is also returning a copy, so even though the stack variable p goes out of scope and gets destroyed, the copy is valid.

I should point out that the Parent pointers retained by the Child objects will be invalid after the end of the family function. Since you didn't explicitly create a copy constructor in Child, one was generated for you automatically by the compiler, and it does a straight copy of the pointer; the pointer will point to an invalid object once p goes out of scope.

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Thanks for the quick reply. OK, so the vector makes copies of things that are pushed onto it. And the Parent p object gets copied when family returns. That explains why I can access the parent and its children. But why can I access the parent through the children? The children are initialized with a pointer to the parent, in this case, a pointer to the local variable Parent p which happens to live at address 0x2aa47470 (please see my updated question). This is a variable local to the family function, right? Why can I still access it from main? –  misha Feb 4 '11 at 4:10
1  
the Child objects that are in the vector survive for this reason, but the pointer to Parent * that each Child contains (which points to p) becomes invalid. If it appears to work, what likely happend is the compiler's optimizer inlined family(), and then combined the storage of main(){p} and family(){p} to avoid copying it. Since the copy constructor was not customized, this optimization would be allowed (but not required). –  puetzk Feb 4 '11 at 4:11
    
@misha, I realized my omission even as you were writing your comment. See the update. –  Mark Ransom Feb 4 '11 at 4:13
    
@puetzk, @Mark: Thanks for clearing that up. I was suspecting that would be the case. So the way to do this properly is to create Parent on the heap, right? How would defining a copy constructor for Child help here? –  misha Feb 4 '11 at 4:17
    
I moved the rest of my comment to a reply, since it's getting long –  puetzk Feb 4 '11 at 4:22
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  • In function family, is Parent p declared on the stack? From looking at the output, it would seem so

Yes, that's right. However, since it is clear that p is returned by the function family, the compiler will use it to store the result instead of actually copying it into left-hand-side of Parent p = family();. In other words, it doesn't create the p in family() and then copies it because that would be wasteful. Instead, it creates the p in main() and uses it as p in family() to store the result directly (avoiding the useless copy).

  • Each created Child goes on the stack too, right?

No, std::vector dynamically allocates memory to store its elements (as indicated by the fact that the size can change at run-time). So the instances of Child that are pushed to the vector container are store in dynamically allocated memory (the Heap).

  • When I create each Child instance, I pass it a pointer to a stack variable. I imagine this is a big no-no, because stack variables are guaranteed to live only until the end of the function. After that the stack should get popped and the variables will be destroyed. Is this correct?

Yes that is correct. You should avoid this situation because it can be unsafe. One good way to avoid this and still have the capability of storing a pointer to the Parent in the Child object is to make the Parent non-copyable (making both copy-constructor and assignment operator private and without an implementation). This will have the effect that since a Parent cannot be copied and since the parent contains its children, the pointer to parent that the children have will never go invalid as long as the children are not destroyed (since they are destroyed along with their parent). This scheme would usually also come with a sort-of factory function for the Child objects and a private access on the Child's constructor granting friendship to the parent or static factory function. That way, it is also possible to prohibit a programmer from creating instances of Child that are not directly owned by the parent to which they are attached. Note also, that move-semantics and/or deep-copying can make the parent "copyable" or at least movable while keeping the children consistent with their parent.

  • vector.push_back() passes arguments by reference, so at the end of the family function, p.children just contains references to the local variables, right?

No, vector takes arguments by const reference, then possibly allocates additional storage for that object, and then places a copy of the argument into that new memory slot (placement new operator). So the p.children are objects (not references) and are contained in the vector (it is called a "container" after all).

  • Why is it all working? In main, why can I access the parent and each of its children? Is it all because the local variables from family are still intact and haven't been overwritten by some subsequent function call?

If you read my first answer, it becomes evident why this still works (but it might not work all the time).

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Thanks for your answer. I understand everything except for the non-copyable class part. Are you saying that if I make Parent non-copyable, then the compiler will always treat it as a local to main as opposed as a local to family? –  misha Feb 4 '11 at 4:41
    
No, hiding the copy constructor will just make this sort of unsafe usage fail to compile, not make it work (the compiler is required to verify that the copy constructor is accessible even if it optimizes out the actual call). Making it work requires writing a copy constructor that actually resets child.parent –  puetzk Feb 4 '11 at 4:44
    
As puetzk said, making it non-copyable just means unsafe use of the Parent class will be prohibited, which is a good thing. It is very often done so to prevent people who don't know the details of the implementation and thus, are unaware that the children hold a pointer to parent, from trying to do something that would not be safe (i.e. you make hard rules for the usage of your code, and that's very desirable in general). The only way that copying a parent makes sense is to copy the children and resetting their parent ptrs (that's a "deep-copy" as opposed to the default "shallow-copy"). –  Mikael Persson Feb 4 '11 at 4:55
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