Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Imagine a quadtree defined as follow:

data (Eq a, Show a) => QT a = C a | Q (QT a) (QT a) (QT a) (QT a)
  deriving (Eq, Show)

bad1 = Q u u u u where u = C 255
bad2 = Q (C 0) (C 255) (Q u u u u) (C 64) where u = C 255

The constructor allows you to create not well-formed quadtrees. bad1 should be simply C 255 and bad2 is not valid too because its bottom-right quadtree (for the same reason, it should be Q (C 0) (C 255) (C 244) (C 64).

So far so good. Checking its well-formness is simply a matter of checking its inner quadtrees recursively. The base case is when all inner quadtrees are leafs, whereby all colors shouldn't be all equals.

wellformed :: (Eq a, Show a) => QT a -> Bool
wellformed (Q (C c1) (C c2) (C c3) (C c4)) = any (/= c1) [c2, c3, c4]
wellformed (Q (C c1) (C c2) se (C c4))     = valid se
-- continue defining patters to match e.g Q C C C, C Q Q C, and so on...

Question: Can I avoid typing all matches for all possible combination of leafs and quadtrees?

Please be patient if my question is quite odd, but it's my second-day-Haskell-seamless-learing!

share|improve this question
    
Depending on what you're interested in, you could just make a unify function that detects the "bad" case where all four elements are equal and turns them into a single element. –  Dan Burton Feb 4 '11 at 6:18
    
@Dan: sure I already did it. I called "sanitize" and does exactly the same as you stated :P –  gremo Feb 4 '11 at 6:30
    
You could also hide the Q constructor from outside the module, and use smart constructors to make sure everything is well-formed. –  rampion Feb 4 '11 at 18:28
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Nevermind...

wellformed :: (Eq a, Show a) => QT a -> Bool
wellformed (C _) = True
wellformed (Q (C c1) (C c2) (C c3) (C c4)) = any (/= c1) [c2, c3, c4]
wellformed (Q nw ne se sw) = wellformed nw && wellformed ne
   && wellformed se && wellformed sw

EDIT: or even better:

wellformed :: (Eq a, Show a) => QT a -> Bool
wellformed (C _) = True
wellformed (Q (C c1) (C c2) (C c3) (C c4)) = any (/= c1) [c2, c3, c4]
wellformed (Q nw ne se sw) = all wellformed [nw, ne, se, sw]

EDIT: note that the bindings are wrong, should be: NW NE SW SE!!!

share|improve this answer
3  
all wellformed [nw ne se sw] would be shorter and more intuitive :-) –  Yasir Arsanukaev Feb 4 '11 at 5:23
    
@Yasir Arsanukaev: Thanks, much more elegant! –  gremo Feb 4 '11 at 5:29
    
I actually forgot to put , between list elements. :-/ –  Yasir Arsanukaev Feb 4 '11 at 5:57
    
Yeah quite obvious :P –  gremo Feb 4 '11 at 7:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.