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Assume, I have a constant number of collections (e.g. 3 ArrayLists) as members of a class. Now, I want to expose all the elements to other classes so they can simply iterate over all elements (ideally, read only). I'm using guava collections and I wonder how I could use guava iterables/iterators to generate a logical view on the internal collections without making temporary copies.

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This seems to be what you need. –  nanda Feb 4 '11 at 10:07
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3 Answers 3

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Use Iterables.concat(Iterable<T> ...), it creates a live view of all the iterables, concatenated into one (if you change the iterables, the concatenated version also changes). Then wrap the concatenated iterable with Iterables.unmodifiableIterable(Iterable<T>) (I hadn't seen the read-only requirement earlier).

From the Iterables.concat( .. ) JavaDocs:

Combines multiple iterables into a single iterable. The returned iterable has an iterator that traverses the elements of each iterable in inputs. The input iterators are not polled until necessary. The returned iterable's iterator supports remove() when the corresponding input iterator supports it.

While this doesn't explicitly say that this is a live view, the last sentence implies that it is (supporting the Iterator.remove() method only if the backing iterator supports it is not possible unless using a live view)

Sample Code:

final List<Integer> first  = Lists.newArrayList(1, 2, 3);
final List<Integer> second = Lists.newArrayList(4, 5, 6);
final List<Integer> third  = Lists.newArrayList(7, 8, 9);
final Iterable<Integer> all =
    Iterables.unmodifiableIterable(
        Iterables.concat(first, second, third));
System.out.println(all);
third.add(9999999);
System.out.println(all);

Output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 9999999]


Edit:

By Request from Damian, here's a similar method that returns a live Collection View

public final class CollectionsX {

    static class JoinedCollectionView<E> implements Collection<E> {

        private final Collection<? extends E>[] items;

        public JoinedCollectionView(final Collection<? extends E>[] items) {
            this.items = items;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean addAll(final Collection<? extends E> c) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public void clear() {
            for (final Collection<? extends E> coll : items) {
                coll.clear();
            }
        }

        @Override
        public boolean contains(final Object o) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean containsAll(final Collection<?> c) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean isEmpty() {
            return !iterator().hasNext();
        }

        @Override
        public Iterator<E> iterator() {
            return Iterables.concat(items).iterator();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean remove(final Object o) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean removeAll(final Collection<?> c) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean retainAll(final Collection<?> c) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public int size() {
            int ct = 0;
            for (final Collection<? extends E> coll : items) {
                ct += coll.size();
            }
            return ct;
        }

        @Override
        public Object[] toArray() {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean add(E e) {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }

    }

    /**
     * Returns a live aggregated collection view of the collections passed in.
     * <p>
     * All methods except {@link Collection#size()}, {@link Collection#clear()},
     * {@link Collection#isEmpty()} and {@link Iterable#iterator()}
     *  throw {@link UnsupportedOperationException} in the returned Collection.
     * <p>
     * None of the above methods is thread safe (nor would there be an easy way
     * of making them).
     */
    public static <T> Collection<T> combine(
        final Collection<? extends T>... items) {
        return new JoinedCollectionView<T>(items);
    }

    private CollectionsX() {
    }

}
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How would I prevent the user from removing elements? Is there a nicer way than wrapping the lists into unmodifiableLists? –  newgre Feb 4 '11 at 10:35
2  
@jn_ just wrap it in Iterables.unmodifiableIterable(iterable) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 4 '11 at 10:36
1  
What about collections? Iterables.concat produces an Iterable, not Collection. I would need a Collection view. –  Nowaker Aug 2 '11 at 10:39
1  
@Sean, yes - size() is what I need. add() throwing an exception is good - I don't care about this method. Collections API is broken and noone can do anything about it. Collection.add(), Iterator.remove(), blah. –  Nowaker Aug 4 '11 at 12:36
1  
@Damian ok, see my updated answer –  Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 4 '11 at 13:08
show 5 more comments

Plain Java 8 solutions using a Stream.

Constant number

Assuming private Collection<T> c, c2, c3.

One solution:

public Stream<T> stream() {
    return Stream.concat(Stream.concat(c.stream(), c2.stream()), c3.stream());
}

Another solution:

public Stream<T> stream() {
    return Stream.of(c, c2, c3).flatMap(Collection::stream);
}

Variable number

Assuming private Collection<Collection<T>> cs:

public Stream<T> stream() {
    return cs.stream().flatMap(Collection::stream);
}
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You could create a new 'List' and 'addAll()' of your other Lists to it. Then return an unmodifiable list with Collections.unmodifiableList().

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That would create a new temporary collection which is potentially quite expensive –  newgre Feb 4 '11 at 10:13
1  
Expensive how, the underlying objects in the lists aren't copied and ArrayList just allocates the space and calls System.arraycopy() under the hood. Can't get much more efficient than that. –  Qwerky Feb 4 '11 at 10:21
2  
How is copying a whole collection for every iteration not expensive? Moreover, you can get better than that, see Seans answer. –  newgre Feb 4 '11 at 10:24
    
It also uses a native implementation to copy the memory, it doesn't iterate through the array. –  Qwerky Feb 4 '11 at 10:35
    
Well if it is copying the array it is certainly an O(n) algorithm which does not scale and has the same complexity as iterating over the array once. Assume each list contains a million elements, then I need to copy a few million elements, only to iterate over them. Bad idea. –  newgre Feb 4 '11 at 10:38
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