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I have a container class with several iterators as nested classes. The structure is something ilke this:

class Grid
{
protected:
    class Iterator
    {
        Iterator(Grid* g) : grid(g){}
        Grid* grid;
    }
    class MoreIterator : public Iterator
    {
    }
}

Now I wanted to move the iterators in a header file of their own, to clean up the containers code.

class Grid
{
protected:
#include "griditerators.h"
}

So far this compiles without errors. But:

In QtCreator the lines

Iterator(Grid* g) : grid(g){}
Grid* grid;

are marked as errors, telling me "Grid is not a type name".

I thought I could solve that with a forward declaration in the griditerator.h file:

class Grid;
class Iterator
{
    Iterator(Grid* g) : grid(g){}
    Grid* grid;
}

But that gives me a compile error: Class Grid has the same name as the class in which it is declared.

Replacing the forward declaration with #include "grid.h" works. But I somehow think that's ugly.

So I have two working options. One shows ugly errors in my IDE, the other I just don't like that much.

I tried other variations, where the include isn't within the enclosing class, but that failed to compile for different reasons.

So my question is: Are there any "best practices" or include patterns to handle nested classes that are too large to keep them within their enclosing class file?

For example would there be a way to declare a nested class like:

class Grid::Iterator
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Don't put the nested class declaration in a separate header file. It's bad design and will confuse the hell out of anyone else who has to maintain your code. If the nested class is too big, unnest it and put it in it's own compilation unit (h/cpp combo).

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, simple solution :) I just liked it to have them nested, since they are very closely related to the enclosing class and quite useless on their own. Is it okay to have a base class (Iterator) and three derived classes (MoreIterator) in one header file? –  thorsten müller Feb 4 '11 at 10:48
    
Sure, I regularly put dozens of classes in one header file. –  Frederik Slijkerman Feb 4 '11 at 13:13

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