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I'm sending an email and I'm receiving it correctly but the encoding of the subject is not correct. I'm sending "invitación" but I'm receiving "invitaci?n". The content of the message is OK.

The content of the message is coming from a transformation of a Velocity Template while the subject is set in a String variable.

I've googled around and I've seen that some people says that MimeUtility.encodeText() could solve the problem, but I have had no success with it.

How can I solve the problem? This is the code I have so far.

String subject = "Invitación";
String msgBody = VelocityEngineUtils.mergeTemplateIntoString(velocityEngine, "/vmTemplates/template.vm", "UTF-8", model);

Properties props = new Properties();
Session session = Session.getDefaultInstance(props, null);

try {
    String encodingOptions = "text/html; charset=UTF-8";
    Message msg = new MimeMessage(session);
    msg.setHeader("Content-Type", encodingOptions);
    msg.setFrom(new javax.mail.internet.InternetAddress(emailFrom));
    msg.addRecipient(Message.RecipientType.TO, new InternetAddress(emailTo));

    msg.setSubject(subject);
    msg.setContent(msgBody, encodingOptions);
    Transport.send(msg);

    } catch (AddressException e) {
        ...
    } catch (MessagingException e) {
        ...
    } 

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

JavaMail has perhaps a little too much abstraction, and you're falling victim to it here. When you use

Message msg = new MimeMessage(session);

you're creating a MimeMessage object but treating it as a Message object. Message has only a setSubject(String subject) method, which uses the platform default charset to encode the subject. If the platform default can't encode it, you get ? characters in the resulting header. MimeMessage, however, has a setSubject(String subject, String charset) method which will allow you to specify the charset you want to use to encode the subject. So just switch your code to

MimeMessage msg = new MimeMessage(session);
msg.setHeader("Content-Type", encodingOptions);
msg.setFrom(new javax.mail.internet.InternetAddress(emailFrom));
msg.addRecipient(Message.RecipientType.TO, new InternetAddress(emailTo));

msg.setSubject(subject, "UTF-8");

and it should work.

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The only shipped subclass of Message is MimeMessage. I'm doubting that anyone's implemented another subclass. JavaMail would be less grotty if they'd just collapsed javax.mail and javax.mail.internet -- that extra layer of abstraction just means you're constantly casting to the subclass. –  dkarp Feb 5 '11 at 16:47
    
This did not resolve my problem (sending the £ symbol in the subject line) –  Mark W Aug 26 '11 at 8:29
1  
@Mark: You tried msg.setSubject("\u00a3", "UTF-8") and it didn't encode the subject properly? What was in the resulting Subject header? –  dkarp Aug 26 '11 at 17:35
    
Sorry. I fixed my problem, was not related to the subect encoding - it was related to reading a file that was used to populate subject, so my subject string was incorrect before adding to message. –  Mark W Sep 5 '11 at 11:37
    
@dkarp: I always thought the spelling was "Groddy" ... I stand corrected :) –  mtyson Dec 4 '12 at 23:06

Maybe you can try: msg.setSubject(subject, "UTF8");

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1  
There is not this method for javax.mail.Message. I'm using Java Mail API provided by AppEngine. –  Javi Feb 4 '11 at 12:32
    
Oh, sorry! I didn't noticed that is related to AppEngine! –  ksimon Feb 4 '11 at 12:36
    
I had forgotten at first. I edited the post later to tag it as AppEngine. Thanks anyway. –  Javi Feb 4 '11 at 12:49

you can use, it works

msg.setSubject(MimeUtility.encodeText("string", "UTF-8", "Q"));
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