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I have a list of timestamps in "%H:%M:%S" format. For example

  09:50:08.650000
  09:50:08.665000
  09:50:08.820000
  09:50:08.877000
  09:50:09.897000
  09:50:09.907000
  09:50:09.953000
  09:50:10.662000
  09:50:10.662000

I need to compute efficiently in python the time difference in milliseconds between each line.

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The format is '%H:%M:%S.%f'. –  eumiro Feb 4 '11 at 14:08
    
I see. Thanks. I have a timedelta representation now. How do I compute the difference in milliseconds? –  LouisChiffre Feb 4 '11 at 14:11
2  
int(diff.seconds * 1000. + diff.microseconds / 1000.) –  eumiro Feb 4 '11 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

%H:%M:%S.%f is the format string to be used when parsing the times. See http://docs.python.org/library/datetime.html#strftime-strptime-behavior

import datetime

times = """
09:50:08.650000
09:50:08.665000
09:50:08.820000
09:50:08.877000
09:50:09.897000
09:50:09.907000
09:50:09.953000
09:50:10.662000
09:50:10.662000
""".split()

# parse all times
times = [datetime.datetime.strptime(x, "%H:%M:%S.%f") for x in times]
for i in range(len(times) - 1):
    # compute timedelta between current and next time in the list
    print times[i + 1] - times[i]

The result:

0:00:00.015000
0:00:00.155000
0:00:00.057000
0:00:01.020000
0:00:00.010000
0:00:00.046000
0:00:00.709000
0:00:00

To output the difference in milliseconds:

delta = times[i + 1] - times[i]
print ((delta.days * 24 * 60 * 60 + delta.seconds) * 1000 + delta.microseconds / 1000)

Note that timedelta only stores days, seconds and microseconds internally. Other units are converted.

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For the conversion in milliseconds, see comment from eurmiro in question comments. –  LouisChiffre Feb 4 '11 at 14:19
    
Thanks for the hint. I've added the conversion and included days (if that ever is needed). –  Reiner Gerecke Feb 4 '11 at 14:21

Have you tried the datetime.strptime() function? It will read in the datetime as a string and convert it into a datetime object.

You can then use datetime.timedelta() to compute the difference in milliseconds.

Documentation here: http://docs.python.org/library/datetime.html#strftime-strptime-behavior

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I tried but using datetime.strptime but using "%H:%M:%S" as format gives a ValueError because of the milliseconds. –  LouisChiffre Feb 4 '11 at 14:04
    
What was the issue you were having? You should note that the float you are using in the string does present a problem for strptime() as %S expects an integer –  Jordan Feb 4 '11 at 14:07
    
thanks for your help. what is the correct formatting then? –  LouisChiffre Feb 4 '11 at 14:08
    
See @squidy's answer he handles the "float" properly using "%S.%f" as the time format. I overlooked the fact that technically you are not looking at a float in the string and can just use the "." as a delimiter. –  Jordan Feb 4 '11 at 14:14

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