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I'm a bit of a noob when it comes to stored procedures in general, but I'm trying to write the following

Create procedure clone_perms 
as
declare @new_id varchar(30), @old_id varchar(30)

declare get_perms cursor for select userspermsUserid, userspermsPermission from users_permissions where userspermsUserid=@old_id

declare @perms varchar(30), @on_off boolean

FETCH get_perms into @perms, @on_off
while(@@sqlstatus=0)
BEGIN
    if exists ( select 1 from permissions where userspermsUserid=@new_id and userspermsPermID=@perm )
    BEGIN   
        update permissions set userspermsPermission=@on_off where userspermsUserid=@new_id and userspermsPermID=@perm
    END
    else
    BEGIN
        insert permissions (userspermsUserID, userspermsPermID, userspermsPermission) values (@new_id, @perms, @on_off)
    END

    FETCH get_perms into @perms, @on_off
END
CLOSE get_perms  

DEALLOCATE CURSOR get_perms
end   

. I get the following error when trying to create it:

/* SQL Error (1064): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'as declare @new_id varchar(30) declare @old_id varchar(30) declare get_perm' at line 2 */

. Does anyone know what I need to do to make this work?

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Please include server version in your question –  AJ. Feb 4 '11 at 14:29
    
I'm using 5.1.45-community –  Jonathan Feb 4 '11 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

You need to have BEGIN tag after CREATE PROCEDURE clone_perms and not AS

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Now I get this error. /* SQL Error (1064): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'BEGIN declare @new_id varchar(30), @old_id varchar(30) declare get_perms cur' at line 2 */ –  Jonathan Feb 4 '11 at 14:40
    
Sorry didn't test it, but that was the most glaring omission I spotted. I'll have a proper look. –  anothershrubery Feb 4 '11 at 14:46

don't use an @ to start local (declared) variable names, that's only for user variables you create with the

SET @varname=value;

statement. you'll also need to terminate your statements with a semicolon. that's the cause of the latest error, there's no ; after your first declare statement.

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