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I would like to know what is correct using of model class in in view model. As MVVM I use Caliburn Micro.

First alternative.

Model class:

    public class CurrentUser : IDataErrorInfo
    {
        public string Nick { get; set; }
        public string Password { get; set; }
//...
    }

Using model in view model class:

[Export(typeof(ILogOnViewModel))]
public class LogOnViewModel : Screen
{
    public CurrentUser CurrentUser { get; set; }

    //bind on control in view
    public string CurrentNick
    {
        get { return CurrentUser.Nick; }
        set
        {
            CurrentUser.Nick = value;
            NotifyOfPropertyChange(() => CurrentNick);
        }
    }

    //bind on control in view
    public string CurrentPassword
    {
        get { return CurrentUser.Password; }
        set
        {
            CurrentUser.Password = value;
            NotifyOfPropertyChange(() => CurrentPassword);
        }
    }
}

Second alternative:

Model class:

    public class CurrentUser : IDataErrorInfo, INotifyPropertyChanged
    {


        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String info)
        {
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
            }
        }

        public string Nick
        {
            get { return _nick; }
            set
            {
                _nick = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged("Nick");
            }
        }

        public string Password
        {
            get { return _password; }
            set
            {
                _password = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged("Password");
            }
        }
//...
    }

Using model class in view model class:

[Export(typeof(ILogOnViewModel))]
public class LogOnViewModel : Screen
{
    //bind on UI control
    public CurrentUser CurrentUser { get; set; }
}
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You can shorten the first approach considerably by using deep property binding, i.e., just name the element binding to the 'Nick' string of 'CurrentUser' "CurentUser_Nick" (and same for CurrentUser_Password" - then you don't need the properties 'CurrentNick' and 'CurrentPassword' at all (add NotifyOfPropertyChange to CurrentUser, though). –  EluciusFTW Mar 6 '13 at 11:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd recommend starting off with the second approach. It could save you from typing out a lot of repetitive bridging properties. If you encounter a property that needs to be wrapped on the View Model, then do so for that property then update the View's binding(s). Both your Model and View Model can implement IDataErrorInfo and INotifyPropertyChanged. The latter is quite useful when some logic in your Model changes a property since it will then be propagated to the View. Implementing those interfaces via base classes, you could have both a ModelBase and a ViewModelBase abstract classes, where the latter derives from the former.

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Just to note, This is not MVVM. You will be breaking almost all the guidelines created for MVVM. And, never ever, ViewModel inherits from Model. –  decyclone Feb 8 '11 at 10:33
    
@decyclone: I think you mean that I broke the one guideline you emphasized in your answer, when you said the View shouldn't directly reference the Model. Although I've seen that mentioned elsewhere, it is by no means essential to MVVM. –  HappyNomad Feb 8 '11 at 11:05
    
Please look at this article for reference: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419663.aspx and decide for yourself how many guidelines were broken. –  decyclone Feb 8 '11 at 11:25
    
That's a great article which I also recommend as an intro to MVVM. I don't see how posting the link here furthers your point, though. –  HappyNomad Feb 8 '11 at 12:01

The first alternative would be better, since it encapsulates your model better from the View.
But you should implement IDataErrorInfo and INotifyPropertyChanged on the ViewModel, since the ViewModel should be the object that notifies your user interface of changes and errors.

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So it is better implement IDataErrorInfo on view model class, this I don’t know. –  user572844 Feb 4 '11 at 15:40
    
Yes, definitely. Also, in WPF you can set ValidatesOnDataErrors=True on your Bindings, and they will automatically use the error information provided by your ViewModel on that Property name. –  Botz3000 Feb 5 '11 at 20:38

I would prefer the first approach. There are a few reasons why:

  • A Model should never be accessible to View.
  • In theory, a ViewModel wraps/facades all properties required to be bound to View from Model. It adds any additional properties, collections and commands required to facilitate View's functionality and while preventing putting code in code behind.
  • IDataErrorInfo and INotifyPropertyChanged facilitate View not ViewModel. And since View only communicates with ViewModel, they should be inside ViewModel.
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I would use the second approach. If you are looking for sample applications that use the second approach then you might find the WPF Application Framework (WAF) project interesting.

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