Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of integers that I would like to convert to one number like:

numList = [1,2,3]
num = magic(numList)

print num, type(num)
>>> 123, <type 'int'>

What is the best way to implement the magic function?

Thanks for your help.

EDIT
I did find this, but it seems like there has to be a better way.

EDIT 2
Let's give some credit to Triptych and cdleary for their great answers! Thanks guys.

share|improve this question
    
It appears that you're assuming base 10. True? –  S.Lott Jan 29 '09 at 1:45
    
@S.Lott, yepper :) base 10 –  Nope Jan 29 '09 at 2:19
add comment

9 Answers

up vote 53 down vote accepted
# Over-explaining a bit:
def magic(numList):         # [1,2,3]
    s = map(str, numList)   # ['1','2','3']
    s = ''.join(s)          # '123'
    s = int(s)              # 123
    return s


# How I'd probably write it:
def magic(numList):
    s = ''.join(map(str, numList))
    return int(s)


# As a one-liner  
num = int(''.join(map(str,numList)))


# Functionally:
s = reduce(lambda x,y: x+str(y), numList, '')
num = int(s)


# Using some oft-forgotten built-ins:
s = filter(str.isdigit, repr(numList))
num = int(s)
share|improve this answer
    
I had thought the map function was deprecated in favor of list comprehensions, but now I can no longer find a note to that effect. thank you, I'll be adding that back into my vocabulary. –  TokenMacGuy Jan 29 '09 at 0:28
    
I assume there's a bug in your "# How I'd probably write it:" and it should be ''.join(map(str, numList)) ? Also, for your "Cleverly" option, you need to int() the result. –  John Fouhy Jan 29 '09 at 0:45
    
Yes your missing map in #2. for a moment there I thought you really were doing magic! –  Robert Gould Jan 29 '09 at 0:49
    
haha thanks - I was editing a bunch and missed it –  Triptych Jan 29 '09 at 0:51
1  
TokenMacGuy: you mean this? - artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=98196 map, reduce, filter, lambda were all to go in 3k originally –  James Brady Jan 29 '09 at 1:50
show 3 more comments

Two solutions:

>>> nums = [1, 2, 3]
>>> magic = lambda nums: int(''.join(str(i) for i in nums)) # Generator exp.
>>> magic(nums)
123
>>> magic = lambda nums: sum(digit * 10 ** (len(nums) - 1 - i) # Summation
...     for i, digit in enumerate(nums))
>>> magic(nums)
123

The map-oriented solution actually comes out ahead on my box -- you definitely should not use sum for things that might be large numbers:

Timeit Comparison

import collections
import random
import timeit

import matplotlib.pyplot as pyplot

MICROSECONDS_PER_SECOND = 1E6
FUNS = []
def test_fun(fun):
    FUNS.append(fun)
    return fun

@test_fun
def with_map(nums):
    return int(''.join(map(str, nums)))

@test_fun
def with_interpolation(nums):
    return int(''.join('%d' % num for num in nums))

@test_fun
def with_genexp(nums):
    return int(''.join(str(num) for num in nums))

@test_fun
def with_sum(nums):
    return sum(digit * 10 ** (len(nums) - 1 - i)
        for i, digit in enumerate(nums))

@test_fun
def with_reduce(nums):
    return int(reduce(lambda x, y: x + str(y), nums, ''))

@test_fun
def with_builtins(nums):
    return int(filter(str.isdigit, repr(nums)))

@test_fun
def with_accumulator(nums):
    tot = 0
    for num in nums:
        tot *= 10
        tot += num
    return tot

def time_test(digit_count, test_count=10000):
    """
    :return: Map from func name to (normalized) microseconds per pass.
    """
    print 'Digit count:', digit_count
    nums = [random.randrange(1, 10) for i in xrange(digit_count)]
    stmt = 'to_int(%r)' % nums
    result_by_method = {}
    for fun in FUNS:
        setup = 'from %s import %s as to_int' % (__name__, fun.func_name)
        t = timeit.Timer(stmt, setup)
        per_pass = t.timeit(number=test_count) / test_count
        per_pass *= MICROSECONDS_PER_SECOND
        print '%20s: %.2f usec/pass' % (fun.func_name, per_pass)
        result_by_method[fun.func_name] = per_pass
    return result_by_method

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pass_times_by_method = collections.defaultdict(list)
    assert_results = [fun([1, 2, 3]) for fun in FUNS]
    assert all(result == 123 for result in assert_results)
    digit_counts = range(1, 100, 2)
    for digit_count in digit_counts:
        for method, result in time_test(digit_count).iteritems():
            pass_times_by_method[method].append(result)
    for method, pass_times in pass_times_by_method.iteritems():
        pyplot.plot(digit_counts, pass_times, label=method)
    pyplot.legend(loc='upper left')
    pyplot.xlabel('Number of Digits')
    pyplot.ylabel('Microseconds')
    pyplot.show()
share|improve this answer
    
holy shit, thats awesome....thanks for doing that! –  Nope Jan 29 '09 at 4:09
    
No problem, but remember you should probably use what's most readable unless you find it's a bottleneck. I just like timing things. ;-) –  cdleary Jan 29 '09 at 5:05
    
I've measured performance of the above function. The results are slightly different e.g. with_accumulator() is faster for small digit_count. See stackoverflow.com/questions/489999/… –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 29 '09 at 23:36
add comment
def magic(numbers):
    return int(''.join([ "%d"%x for x in numbers]))
share|improve this answer
    
nice to see someone else whose brain works like mine. –  elliot42 Jan 29 '09 at 9:22
add comment
def magic(number):
    return int(''.join(str(i) for i in number))
share|improve this answer
    
Nitpick - you can remove the [ ] and do the str'ing as a generation expression. int(''.join(str(i) for i in number)) - it's.. two bytes quicker! –  dbr Oct 8 '09 at 1:31
add comment

Just for completeness, here's a variant that uses print() (works on Python 2.6-3.x):

from __future__ import print_function
try: from cStringIO import StringIO
except ImportError:
     from io import StringIO

def to_int(nums, _s = StringIO()):
    print(*nums, sep='', end='', file=_s)
    s = _s.getvalue()
    _s.truncate(0)
    return int(s)


I've measured performance of @cdleary's functions. The results are slightly different.

Each function tested with the input list generated by:

def randrange1_10(digit_count): # same as @cdleary
    return [random.randrange(1, 10) for i in xrange(digit_count)]

You may supply your own function via --sequence-creator=yourmodule.yourfunction command-line argument (see below).

The fastest functions for a given number of integers in a list (len(nums) == digit_count) are:

  • len(nums) in 1..30

    def _accumulator(nums):
        tot = 0
        for num in nums:
            tot *= 10
            tot += num
        return tot
    
  • len(nums) in 30..1000

    def _map(nums):
        return int(''.join(map(str, nums)))
    
    
    def _imap(nums):
        return int(''.join(imap(str, nums)))
    

Figure: N = 1000

|------------------------------+-------------------|
| Fitting polynom              | Function          |
|------------------------------+-------------------|
| 1.00  log2(N)   +  1.25e-015 | N                 |
| 2.00  log2(N)   +  5.31e-018 | N*N               |
| 1.19  log2(N)   +      1.116 | N*log2(N)         |
| 1.37  log2(N)   +      2.232 | N*log2(N)*log2(N) |
|------------------------------+-------------------|
| 1.21  log2(N)   +      0.063 | _interpolation    |
| 1.24  log2(N)   -      0.610 | _genexp           |
| 1.25  log2(N)   -      0.968 | _imap             |
| 1.30  log2(N)   -      1.917 | _map              |

Figure: N = 1000_000

To plot the first figure download cdleary.py and make-figures.py and run (numpy and matplotlib must be installed to plot):

$ python cdleary.py

Or

$ python make-figures.py --sort-function=cdleary._map \
> --sort-function=cdleary._imap \
> --sort-function=cdleary._interpolation \
> --sort-function=cdleary._genexp --sort-function=cdleary._sum \
> --sort-function=cdleary._reduce --sort-function=cdleary._builtins \
> --sort-function=cdleary._accumulator \
> --sequence-creator=cdleary.randrange1_10 --maxn=1000
share|improve this answer
    
That's a strange way to write it in a Python 2.6/3.0 way.. print(''.join(str(x) for x in [1,2,3,4,5])) will work in Python 2.5, 2.6, 3.x, probably more... –  dbr Oct 8 '09 at 1:43
    
@dbr: the purpose was to use the print function. It is not recommended way, that's why I wrote "for completeness". –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 8 '09 at 20:17
add comment

pseudo-code:

int magic(list nums)
{
  int tot = 0

  while (!nums.isEmpty())
  {
    int digit = nums.takeFirst()
    tot *= 10
    tot += digit
  }

  return tot
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you missed the part where he was looking for a python solution :P –  Dana Jan 29 '09 at 0:23
    
That's okay -- Andrew's solution was actually one of the fastest when converted to Python. +1 from me! –  cdleary Jan 29 '09 at 2:34
    
It is the fastest solution (@cdleary's implementation in Python) if the list size is less than 30. stackoverflow.com/questions/489999/… –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 30 '09 at 2:50
add comment

This seems pretty clean, to me.

def magic( aList, base=10 ):
    n= 0
    for d in aList:
        n = base*n + d
    return n
share|improve this answer
    
reduce(lambda x, y: base*x + y, aList, 0) is even cleaner ;) –  Xion Sep 5 '11 at 12:26
    
@Xion: "cleaner"? Not to some folks. reduce() often creates additional problems when used carelessly. I strongly encourage your to post your own answer, since yours is so different from this one. –  S.Lott Sep 6 '11 at 12:14
add comment

Using a generator expression:

def magic(numbers):
    digits = ''.join(str(n) for n in numbers)
    return int(digits)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for no strange usage of lambda/map/etc –  dbr Oct 8 '09 at 1:24
add comment

This method works in 2.x as long as each element in the list is only a single digit. But you shouldn't actually use this. It's horrible.

>>> magic = lambda l:int(`l`[1::3])
>>> magic([3,1,3,3,7])
31337
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.