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I want to override a method from a module A from another module B that will monkey-patch A.
http://codepad.org/LPMCuszt

module A
  def foo; puts 'A' end
end

module B
  def foo; puts 'B'; super; end
end

A.module_eval { include B } # why no override ???

class C
  include A
end

# must print 'A B', but only prints 'A' :(
C.new.foo
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This was an alias_method_chain case. –  clyfe Feb 7 '11 at 13:10
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
module A
  def foo
    puts 'A'
  end
end

module B
  def foo
    puts 'B'
    super
  end
end

include A # you need to include module A befor you can override method

A.module_eval { include B }

class C
  include A
end

C.new.foo # => B A
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Indeed your solution works but this behavior annoying, I don't want to include the module somewhere where it's not needed. Any ideas on why ruby behaves like this ? –  clyfe Feb 4 '11 at 17:08
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Including a module places it above the module/class that is including it in the class hierarchy. In other words, A#foo is not super of B#foo but rather the other way round.

If you think of including a module as a way of doing multiple inheritance this makes sense, include SomeModule is a way of saying, "Treat SomeModule like it is a parent class for me".

To get the output you wanted you need to reverse the inclusion so that B includes A:

module A
  def foo; puts 'A' end
end

module B
  def foo; puts 'B'; super; end
end

B.module_eval { include A } # Reversing the inclusion

class C
  include B # not include A
end

puts C.new.foo

Edit in response to comment:

Then either include both A and B in C with B included after A:

# A and B as before without including B in A.

class C
  include A
  include B
end

or patch A in C itself and don't bother with B.

# A as before, no B.

class C
  include A

  def foo; puts 'B'; super; end
end

The only way for this to work is if the method lookup on C is C -> B -> A and there is no way to do this without including B into C.

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it is a requirement for C to include A and not B, and what I need is to monkey patch A. –  clyfe Feb 4 '11 at 17:05
    
I cannot modify C. I can only monkey patch A. –  clyfe Feb 4 '11 at 18:32
    
@clyfe Why can't you modify C? –  Jonathan Feb 4 '11 at 19:50
    
A is in a gem, B is another gem that extends the functionality in A, and I don't want future users to have to do additional steps other than install and include gem B in project. –  clyfe Feb 7 '11 at 12:17
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