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I have a Django model where I'm importing a number of items:

from django.db import models
from mcif.models.import_profile import ImportProfile
from mcif.models.import_file import ImportFile
from mcif.models.import_bundle import ImportBundle
from mcif.models.customer import Customer
#from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport
from mcif.models.csv_row import CSVRow
import csv, cStringIO

It works fine, but when I uncomment that line that's commented, I get this:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "./manage.py", line 11, in <module>
    execute_manager(settings)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/core/management/__init__.py", line 438, in execute_manager
    utility.execute()
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/core/management/__init__.py", line 379, in execute
    self.fetch_command(subcommand).run_from_argv(self.argv)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/core/management/base.py", line 191, in run_from_argv
    self.execute(*args, **options.__dict__)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/core/management/base.py", line 220, in execute
    output = self.handle(*args, **options)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/core/management/base.py", line 351, in handle
    return self.handle_noargs(**options)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/core/management/commands/shell.py", line 18, in handle_noargs
    loaded_models = get_models()
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/db/models/loading.py", line 167, in get_models
    self._populate()
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/db/models/loading.py", line 64, in _populate
    self.load_app(app_name)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/db/models/loading.py", line 78, in load_app
    models = import_module('.models', app_name)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/utils/importlib.py", line 35, in import_module
    __import__(name)
  File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/__init__.py", line 5, in <module>
    from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport
  File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/account_import.py", line 2, in <module>
    from mcif.models.generic_import import GenericImport
  File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/generic_import.py", line 6, in <module>
    from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport
ImportError: cannot import name AccountImport

Why doesn't Django like this one particular file?

(I can load AccountImport by itself on the console just fine.)

Also, here's AccountImport if it helps to see it:

from django.db import models
from mcif.models.generic_import import GenericImport

class AccountImport(models.Model):

    id = models.BigIntegerField(primary_key=True)
    generic_import = models.ForeignKey(GenericImport)
    is_entirely_international = models.IntegerField()
    is_queued = models.IntegerField()
    created_at = models.DateTimeField()
    updated_at = models.DateTimeField()

    class Meta:
        db_table = u'account_import'
        app_name = 'mcif'

And GenericImport:

from django.db import models
from mcif.models.import_profile import ImportProfile
from mcif.models.import_file import ImportFile
from mcif.models.import_bundle import ImportBundle
from mcif.models.customer import Customer
from mcif.models.csv_row import CSVRow
import csv, cStringIO

class GenericImport(models.Model):

    class Meta:
        db_table = u'generic_import'
        app_name = 'mcif'

    id = models.BigIntegerField(primary_key=True)
    import_profile = models.ForeignKey(ImportProfile)
    import_file = models.ForeignKey(ImportFile)
    notes = models.TextField()
    start_time = models.DateTimeField()
    end_time = models.DateTimeField()
    active = models.IntegerField()
    created_at = models.DateTimeField()
    updated_at = models.DateTimeField()
    unsavable_rows = models.TextField()
    import_bundle = models.ForeignKey(ImportBundle)
    is_queued = models.IntegerField()

    @classmethod
    def last(cls):
        all = GenericImport.objects.all()
        return all[len(all) - 1]

    def process(self):
        for line in self.import_file.file.split("\n")[:30]:
            f = cStringIO.StringIO(line)
            row = CSVRow()
            row.array = next(csv.reader(f))
            row.generic_import = self
            row.process()
            f.close()

    def specific_import(self):
        for model_name in ['TransactionImport', 'AccountImport']:
            specific_imports = eval(model_name + '.objects.filter(generic_import__pk=5)')
            if len(specific_imports) > 0:
                return specific_imports[0]
        return False
share|improve this question
    
Either you've modified GenericImport since you ran into the problem or this is not the right file. There is no from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport on line 6 of this file. –  Daniel DiPaolo Feb 4 '11 at 16:32
    
Right. I took the commented-out line and just deleted it. Other than that it's identical. –  Jason Swett Feb 4 '11 at 16:35
    
So have you retried this after that? If you run into the same error, post the new traceback. The line obviously wasn't commented out when you ran it the first time, or it wouldn't have executed and shown up in the traceback. –  Daniel DiPaolo Feb 4 '11 at 16:36
    
Yeah, I tried it both ways before I posted the question. If I don't import AccountImport, specific_import() won't work because GenericImport doesn't know about TransactionImport or AccountImport. –  Jason Swett Feb 4 '11 at 16:39
    
Yeah, see my updated answer - this is bad design (and it's no coincidence that this won't work). A better pattern exists, either you can pass in a list of classes to check (still not great) or you can have a separate class that manages this. –  Daniel DiPaolo Feb 4 '11 at 16:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a circular import - mcif.models.generic_import and mcif.models.account_import are trying to import each other.

Remember that Python is not Java, and is quite happy to have multiple classes in a single file, especially if they're closely related like these two seem to be. Put them both in a single mcif.models file.

share|improve this answer
    
I hope there's another way. I have over 30 different models, each with its own file. It would seem inconsistent to have just one case where I have two models in the same file. It would also seem irresponsible to put all 30+ models in the same file. Any other suggestions? –  Jason Swett Feb 4 '11 at 16:23
2  
That's no way to write Python, seriously. Models should be split up logically into apps, not all separated into single-class files within a single app. –  Daniel Roseman Feb 4 '11 at 16:29
1  
Are you saying I should put all the models in one file? If so, how come? (Besides the obvious circular reference problem) –  Jason Swett Feb 4 '11 at 16:34

That is a circular model dependency.

File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/__init__.py", line 5, in <module>
    from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport
File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/account_import.py", line 2, in <module>
    from mcif.models.generic_import import GenericImport
File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/generic_import.py", line 6, in <module>
    from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport
ImportError: cannot import name AccountImport

If you really need those models separated, have a look at http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.2/ref/models/fields/#django.db.models.ForeignKey for a solution. Instead of importing the model, you can refer to it with a string.

class Car(models.Model):
    manufacturer = models.ForeignKey('production.Manufacturer')

Will use the Manufacturer model from the production module as target of the foreignkey.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks like a good idea but it doesn't work for some reason: pastebin.com/4qvLjhr5 Any idea why not? –  Jason Swett Feb 4 '11 at 16:43
    
models still should come from django.db. In your example you're using mcif.models.ForeignKey. Unless you implemented your own ForeignKey, this is incorrect. You only need to remove the from mcif.models.generic_import import GenericImport line and replace the direct reference of GenericImport in the foreignkey with mcif.models.generic_import.GenericImport. –  Reiner Gerecke Feb 4 '11 at 18:09

It looks like you have a circular import there.

  File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/__init__.py", line 5, in <module>
    from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport
  File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/account_import.py", line 2, in <module>
    from mcif.models.generic_import import GenericImport
  File "/home/jason/projects/mcifdjango/mcif/models/generic_import.py", line 6, in <module>
    from mcif.models.account_import import AccountImport

Your __init__.py imports AccountImport which imports GenericImport which then again imports AccountImport, though I'm not sure how importing it would work at all, honestly.

Does your GenericImport really need to import AccountImport? Seems like broken hierarchy.

edit: (for the updates)

def specific_import(self):
    for model_name in ['TransactionImport', 'AccountImport']:
        specific_imports = eval(model_name + '.objects.filter(generic_import__pk=5)')
        if len(specific_imports) > 0:
            return specific_imports[0]
    return False

The eval line reeks of bad practice. There is certainly a better pattern here to use than this. Your generic classes should not have any knowledge or reliance on your specific implementations, not to mention eval really has almost no place in real code.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I see that, but if I take the reference to GenericImport out of AccountImport it complains that AccountImport doesn't know about GenericImport. I can't think of any way to fix that problem. –  Jason Swett Feb 4 '11 at 16:19
    
I'd say your generic class (GenericImport) shouldn't have to know about the specific class (AccountImport), what does GenericImport look like? –  Daniel DiPaolo Feb 4 '11 at 16:21
    
Any idea what the pattern is called? I'm not a big fan of the way I'm doing it, either, but I did it that way because I couldn't think of anything better. –  Jason Swett Feb 4 '11 at 16:46
    
At this point, it's probably best posed as a new question here, I don't have the answer at the moment. –  Daniel DiPaolo Feb 4 '11 at 17:03
    
What does your mcif/models/__init__.py look like? Django will only look for models in <app_name>.models, which may explain why it can't find your models. Try importing them into mcif/models/__init__.py –  Zach Feb 4 '11 at 17:34

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